cycle paths – Company Of Cyclists http://companyofcyclists.com/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 05:01:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://companyofcyclists.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7-120x120.png cycle paths – Company Of Cyclists http://companyofcyclists.com/ 32 32 Why US cities are investing in safer, more connected cycling infrastructure – Streetsblog USA https://companyofcyclists.com/why-us-cities-are-investing-in-safer-more-connected-cycling-infrastructure-streetsblog-usa/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 05:01:55 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/why-us-cities-are-investing-in-safer-more-connected-cycling-infrastructure-streetsblog-usa/ This article originally appeared on Urban Wire, the blog of the Urban Institute, and is republished with permission. Every year, hundreds of cyclists die in traffic accidents in the United States. Their experience is the product of high-speed roads, drivers who don’t recognize the people around them and, above all, dangerous road infrastructure for cyclists. […]]]>

This article originally appeared on Urban Wire, the blog of the Urban Institute, and is republished with permission.

Every year, hundreds of cyclists die in traffic accidents in the United States. Their experience is the product of high-speed roads, drivers who don’t recognize the people around them and, above all, dangerous road infrastructure for cyclists.

To address this issue, many US cities have committed to achieving the Vision Zero goal of eliminating all road deaths and serious injuries. A key approach for many cities is to improve cycle paths and other facilities. But are cities really changing the way they invest in cycling infrastructure?

As part of a review of the Final Mile program, a philanthropically funded effort to encourage the development of comprehensive and safe cycling networks, we assessed changes in cycling infrastructure choices by 13 cities across the country. We found that these cities are increasingly focusing their cycling investments on infrastructure that prioritizes safety so as to produce better networks. These investments are likely to increase cycling in US cities, but future investments would benefit from prioritizing equitable access and community decision-making.

Protected bike paths provide economic, safety and traffic benefits

Traditional cycling infrastructure, often in the form of bike lanes and shared lanes called ‘sharrows’, does not protect cyclists by requiring them to share the road with cars. Protected infrastructures, on the other hand, offer cyclists safety from cars thanks to a separation in the right-of-way. Off-street trails, buffered bike lanes and bike lanes ensure cyclists don’t have to worry about drivers getting in their way.

Evidence shows that protected bike lanes improve the economies of surrounding neighborhoods, improve safety and increase ridership. In 2013, for example, Salt Lake City converted nine parking blocks into a protected bike lane. Sales rose 8.8% for stores along the bike path, compared to a 7.0% increase citywide.

New York City’s injury rates for all road users, including drivers, pedestrians and cyclists, have generally decreased by 40-50% (PDF) in areas where the city has implemented protected cycle paths. In Montreal, streets with protected bike lanes had, on average, a 28% lower injury rate than other streets.

In some places, the establishment of protected bike paths has increased ridership. From 2009 to 2014, bicycle trips doubled in New York City and Washington, DC, both of which had built relatively extensive networks of protected bike paths.

One explanation for this increase in ridership could be a greater sense of safety when using the improved infrastructure. In the San Francisco Bay Area, a majority of drivers and cyclists surveyed felt more comfortable on roads with greater separation between cars and bikes.

Cities are increasingly focusing on building safer cycling infrastructure

To determine whether local governments nationwide are creating safer and more secure cycling networks, we examined cycling infrastructure investments over the past five years in 13 US cities using municipal data.

Among these cities, the average share of their new protected cycling infrastructure has increased from 57% in 2016 to 78% in 2020. This rate has increased steadily in most cities, indicating a growing attention to safety. In Denver, approximately 5 miles of protected lanes and 18 miles of regular bike lanes were built in 2016, compared to 16 miles of protected lanes and 19 miles of regular lanes in 2021.

A Denver interviewee said protected bike lanes “make the Mile High City safer, smarter and more connected. By sharing the street a little more, we gain much more security. Plus, we’re getting more clarity on the rules of the road, more equality in transportation, and more access to the Denver we love.

But investment varied from city to city over the study period. Austin, New Orleans, Portland and Seattle have focused about 90% or more of their new cycling investments, excluding bike boulevards, on safe projects like off-street trails. On the other hand, most new lanes in Atlanta, Kansas City, Los Angeles, and Nashville were unprotected.

Cities are prioritizing the construction of connected cycling networks

Research shows that the presence of a well-connected cycling network encourages more people, especially women and low-income people, to cycle. The U.S. Department of Transportation reports that a well-connected multimodal transportation network “can also improve health by increasing access to health care, goods, and services.”

The good news is that many cities are developing more connected cycling networks.

A lawyer we interviewed in Denver explained that “there has been an evolution towards a connected network, from a series of disconnected street segments,” which they say was “the previous approach.” .

And Pittsburgh city staff pointed out that the new cycling infrastructure has connected a “previously fragmented network.” As a result, although only 40% of the tracks have been linked together, network connectivity has increased to 80% after recent investments.

Greater network connectivity can create many social and health benefits, such as improving residents’ access to public libraries, thereby increasing their access to community development resources, including the Internet and events for underserved residents. .

But American cities still have a lot of work to do to ensure such access. Less than a fifth of libraries in Los Angeles, for example, are within a quarter mile of protected bicycle infrastructure.

Despite the benefits of protected cycling infrastructure, opposition is common, often because such improvements force cities to remove parking. But these opinions are generally in the minority. Ultimately, removing parking spaces and replacing them with cycling infrastructure benefits community health, promotes safety, and provides economic benefits to businesses.

Recommendations for a safe and equitable infrastructure

To ensure that cycling projects benefit everyone, cities should work to promote equity of access in project planning by prioritizing investments in communities with more residents of color and families to low income.

In some cases, this direction may raise concerns among residents about bike lanes encouraging gentrification. As such, projects should be built with existing residents at the forefront of decision-making regarding routes and improvements.

Finally, cities can consider investing in programs that provide instruction and assistance in purchasing bicycles for families who otherwise might not have access to safe cycling. With each of these strategies, cities can ensure that cycling is open to all.

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Lack of consultation on new cycling infrastructure in Dublin City, councilors say https://companyofcyclists.com/lack-of-consultation-on-new-cycling-infrastructure-in-dublin-city-councilors-say/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/lack-of-consultation-on-new-cycling-infrastructure-in-dublin-city-councilors-say/ There is a lack of consultation regarding new cycling infrastructure in Dublin City, local councilors say. Speaking at a meeting of Dublin City Council on Monday evening, many councilors said cycling infrastructure was being provided on an ‘ad hoc basis’ and more input was needed from councilors and councilors. inhabitants. Construction of the planned cycle […]]]>

There is a lack of consultation regarding new cycling infrastructure in Dublin City, local councilors say.

Speaking at a meeting of Dublin City Council on Monday evening, many councilors said cycling infrastructure was being provided on an ‘ad hoc basis’ and more input was needed from councilors and councilors. inhabitants.

Construction of the planned cycle route from Clontarf to the town center will cause significant traffic disruption for some residents, councilors say, and those residents have not been consulted enough about it, it has also been claimed .

A report by the council’s deputy chief executive and municipal engineer claimed that 22,000 leaflets about the project were delivered to local homes in January.

However, Cllr Nial Ring said many of his constituents had never received a leaflet and were unaware of what the project entailed. “Where were the leaflets distributed? Where I have businesses, connections, friends, none of them have been informed. No one in Ballybough, East Wall and North Strand was told,’ he said.

Cllr Christy Burke said residents of Ballybough, Summerhill Parade and Portland Row will suffer the ‘hits of traffic diversion’ while the cycleway is being built.

He added that these residents would not benefit from the bike lanes, tree planting or trail improvements during the works programme.

Serious company

Cllr Damian O’Farrell said all councilors were in favor of the Clontarf cycle route to the town centre, but Fairview and Ballybough are a ‘narrow little gateway’ to the town, and any diversion of traffic will be a serious business. “A contractor has now been appointed and there is an urgent need for councilors to be involved in a traffic management plan.”

Cllr Keith Connolly of Fianna Fáil raised traffic concerns at the junction between Griffith Avenue, St Mobhi Road and Ballymun Road, saying: ‘Last week a contraflow cycle track started to cross the road, without any informing councilors again and without informing the local football club, Tolka Rovers.

He said more consultation should have taken place and that situations like this undermine well-meaning projects.

Many councilors also criticized the use of plastic bollards to separate cycle lanes and called for more permanent solutions.

A map of the connection of all cycle paths should also be shown to councillors, it was argued.

Leaflet

Regarding the Clontarf cycle route to the town centre, Brendan O’Brien, the council’s technical services manager, said he could ask the company that did the leafleting to provide a map of the areas covered, to make sure none were missed.

The project is at a stage where traffic management plans are ready to be drawn up, and more information will be available “shortly”, he added.

He said the plastic bollards on the cycle paths were not ideal and the council would consider planters and borders to replace them. However, he said the more inconspicuous the segregation, the more likely it is that people won’t see it and hurt themselves.

Segregation is necessary to prevent people from parking in cycle lanes and posing a danger to cyclists, according to Mr O’Brien.

Other issues raised at the meeting were illegal dumping, particularly dog ​​fouling. Cllr Dermot Lacey from Labor said that in the past five years there have only been 27 fines for dog fouling.

Many councilors have called on the local authority to take charge of household waste collection, saying the privatization of waste collection has led to more illegal dumping.

Many praised locals who voluntarily engaged in litter picking and called for more litter keepers on the spot to catch people leaving litter.

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Nearly €7 million received for pedestrian and cycling infrastructure in Laois and Offaly https://companyofcyclists.com/nearly-e7-million-received-for-pedestrian-and-cycling-infrastructure-in-laois-and-offaly/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 16:55:54 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/nearly-e7-million-received-for-pedestrian-and-cycling-infrastructure-in-laois-and-offaly/ Freelance TD for Laois Offaly Carol Nolan has warmly welcomed the allocation of more than €6.8m to counties under the Active Travel scheme. Deputy Nolan was speaking after Transport Minister Eamon Ryan confirmed to him today that the National Transport Authority (NTA) has allocated the funds for walking and cycling infrastructure to local authorities in […]]]>

Freelance TD for Laois Offaly Carol Nolan has warmly welcomed the allocation of more than €6.8m to counties under the Active Travel scheme.

Deputy Nolan was speaking after Transport Minister Eamon Ryan confirmed to him today that the National Transport Authority (NTA) has allocated the funds for walking and cycling infrastructure to local authorities in Laois and Offaly .

The allocation for Offaly will see €3.681m directed towards 20 individual projects. The whole of Laois will see an allocation of 3 million euros for 18 projects.

Speaking after Minister Ryan confirmed the funding to her, MP Nolan said she would continue to welcome, on a bipartisan basis, any funding that will contribute to the renewal of local amenities such as footbridges and cycle paths and Safe to School programs.

“I am deeply committed to improving local infrastructure across the riding. Indeed, I have been actively advocating for this type of funding with the minister for some time.

“We need rural and even urban communities that are healthy and safe places to live and enjoy recreation.

“We also need to ensure that adequate levels of funding are dedicated to improving footpaths and crosswalks, which is why I was pleased to have Minister Ryan confirm to me today that significant funding will be dedicated to these issues in Offaly and Laois, she said.

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Over €24m allocated to pedestrian and cycle infrastructure projects in Limerick https://companyofcyclists.com/over-e24m-allocated-to-pedestrian-and-cycle-infrastructure-projects-in-limerick/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/over-e24m-allocated-to-pedestrian-and-cycle-infrastructure-projects-in-limerick/ OVER €24 million in funding has been announced to help provide improved pedestrian and cycling infrastructure at locations in Limerick City and across the county. Transport Minister Eamon Ryan has confirmed details of the funding that will be allocated to Limerick City and County Council by the National Transport Authority (NTA) over the next 12 […]]]>

OVER €24 million in funding has been announced to help provide improved pedestrian and cycling infrastructure at locations in Limerick City and across the county.

Transport Minister Eamon Ryan has confirmed details of the funding that will be allocated to Limerick City and County Council by the National Transport Authority (NTA) over the next 12 months.

Over 40 projects in Limerick will receive funding, including the Childers Road multimodal orbital corridor (€1 million); the Dooradoyle town center cycle path in Limerick (€1.66 million); connections to Limerick Greenway (€1m) and delivery of new pedestrian and cycling measures at Mill Road, Corbally (€1.05m)

“It’s great to see our investment in active travel starting to pay off. I want us to accelerate the delivery of sustainable modes of transport now as we emerge from the majority of Covid restrictions. It is vital that we do not allow a return to deadlock as we emerge from the pandemic. We must use the shift to remote working as an opportunity to reallocate road space to create a safer and more efficient transport system, Minister Ryan said.

Limerick City Green Party TD Brian Leddin welcomed the funding for local projects.

“This meets a key Green Party commitment to provide safe facilities for pedestrians and cyclists across Limerick. Projects such as the upgrading of Mill Road, new cycle facilities on Hyde Road, as part of the cycle route Dooradoyle to downtown, and many other locations across the city and county will make our roads safer and provide a healthier alternative for parents, their children, the elderly, and people of all abilities. increased funding for trails and pedestrian improvements in cities and towns across the county,” he said.

Limerick projects funded

Dublin Road Bus Corridor – Parkway to NTP (€250,000)

Raheen to Quinns Cross (€550,000)

Castletroy Urban Greenway (€60,000)

Improvements to Milford Plassey Park Junction (€150,000)

LIT cycle path in the city center (€200,000)

Rhebogue railway underpass (€50,000)

Dooradoyle Road bus and cycle lane improvement works (€150,000)

City Center Traffic Management Plan (€100,000)

Clare Street to Condell Road Cycleway (Phase 1) (€200,000)

UL at National Technology Park Cycle Path (€200,000)

St Paul Junction, Dooradoyle (€150,000)

Parnell – Wickham – Clare Street Cycle Route (€100,000)

Childers Road Multimodal Orbital Corridor (€1,000,000)

Golf Links Road (Castletroy Link Road) (€50,000)

City center pedestrian and cycle bridges (€250,000)

Father Russell Road Bike Program (€200,000)

Mary Immaculate College Bike Path to Downtown (€200,000)

Dooradoyle Cycle Route to City Center (via Hyde Road) (€1,660,000)

LIHAF Mungret Distributor Road – Pedestrian and Cyclist Measures (€400,000)

Pedestrian and cycling measures Mill Road, Corbally (€1,050,000)

Ballycummin Road Pedestrian and Cycle Project (€50,000)

Patrickswell Village Renewal Program (Partly Funded) – Pedestrian and Cyclist Measures (€750,000)

Safe to Schools Program – Supporting Infrastructure (€300,000)

Improvement works on the path in the village of Glin (€200,000)

Kildimo pedestrian link works (€44,000)

Caherconlish trail improvement works (€30,000)

Kilmallock Pedestrian Facilities (€30,000)

Development of Barrow House (€466,568)

Ballysimon Road Bike Program (€500,000)

Ennis Road Cycling Scheme (€500,000)

Roxboro On-Road Cycling Program (€500,000)

Old Cratloe Road (€250,000)

Metropolitan district – renewal of cycle paths and greenways (€1,000,000)

Metropolitan district – new pathways (€2,500,000)

Metro district – renewal of sidewalks (€1,000,000)

Cappamore-Kilmallock Municipal District – Minor Trail Projects (€1,500,000)

Municipal District of Adare-Rathkeale – Minor Trail Projects (€1,150,000)

Municipal District of Newcastle West – Minor Footpath Projects (€1,150,000)

Limerick Greenway Connections (€1,000,000)

Limerick City and County Council Active Travel Office – Staff costs (€2,000,000)

Bike parking/Security/Maintenance equipment (€250,000)

Limerick City and County Council Rapid Rollout Active Displacement Measures (€1,000,000)

Low cost (€750,000) junction/crosswalk tightening devices

Low cost permeability measurements (€500,000)

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How weekly bike rides with a group of supportive women showed me a path to joy | Cycling https://companyofcyclists.com/how-weekly-bike-rides-with-a-group-of-supportive-women-showed-me-a-path-to-joy-cycling/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 16:24:35 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/how-weekly-bike-rides-with-a-group-of-supportive-women-showed-me-a-path-to-joy-cycling/ I always thought of amusement rides as slashing cars and taking them for a spin, often while drunk. That’s what some of the wayward guys did on the Chingford Hall council estate where I grew up. So I was surprised when the Waltham Forest newsletter pointed out another kind of ride: a free cycling group, […]]]>

I always thought of amusement rides as slashing cars and taking them for a spin, often while drunk. That’s what some of the wayward guys did on the Chingford Hall council estate where I grew up. So I was surprised when the Waltham Forest newsletter pointed out another kind of ride: a free cycling group, for women, that lends bikes to members who need them. It has grown since its inception, but Joy Riders started right here in my borough where we have an infrastructure of 27 km of cycle paths, known as Mini Holland.

London was coming out of the last lockdown and one of the most isolated years we’ve ever had when I discovered the band. I had returned to my roots after living in California in hopes that this country would be kinder to my youngest son. He had bounced around the mental health system in the United States for nearly a decade, where the “cure” had been worse than the diagnosis. But the pandemic got in the way of my plan. When my son was once again admitted to a mental hospital, only here rather than in America, I knew I needed a better roadmap to find my way through the pain.

I hadn’t ridden a bike in ages, but had loved it since learning to pedal around the podium, a large concrete slab that surrounded our estate. I felt safe with the two small extra wheels Mom had mounted somewhat unevenly on my bike, even though they leaned me to one side, more like a Hells Angel passenger on a Harley than a five-year-old girl. years on a Raleigh Chipper.

When it was time to ride without the stabilizers, mum ran behind me shouting, “Pedal, pedal! then she gave me an almighty nudge into a world where it was just me and my bike. It was her way of doing most things, trusting that I would find my way.

Mom is long gone from this land. I am the eldest now. I feel it in my joints, I see it on my face in the car rear view mirror as I drive to Jubilee Park in Leyton for my first excursion with the JoyRiders. I hope I can hold on. I hope it won’t hurt my back. I have already sent a message to Mariam, the co-director of the group, to tell her that I am 1m70 tall and that I am heavy. She’s leading the morning run today and I want to make sure the bike I’m borrowing will support my weight. In retrospect, my rating is redundant. It’s a rugged hybrid Raleigh I’ll be using, not a miniature pony.

Jubilee Park wakes up runners and dog walkers, and it smells of freshly cut grass. I head to the container where the council’s stock of bikes is kept. Mariam has a soft accent – a mix of her Dutch and German heritage – and a no-frills sense of leadership. She reassures me that my body will remember what to do. “Muscle memory, she insists. I know there are other things my body takes into account. The trauma of watching my son struggle over the years. I’m not saying anything about it, though, nor am I saying I’m gay and Jewish. It doesn’t seem relevant until the other women start arriving, many of whom are wearing traditional Islamic clothing. Will it matter to them, I wonder? Is this the right group for me? Will I fit in?

Mariam welcomes everyone and work diligently to adjust my saddle so that I can touch the ground with my tiptoes. She walks us through an ABCD checklist for our bikes: Air; brakes; Chain; Direction. Soraya speaks first, introducing herself and reminding me of how the gears work. She also borrows a bicycle. I watch her put on her jilbab over a wide belt and place two bike clips around her pants. Her hijab is tucked neatly under her bicycle helmet. Some of the other women also wear jilbabs and hijabs. There are no padded bike shorts here. No titanium road bikes either. As the women chat and fish in their backpacks for their phones, their purses, their water bottles, I feel like this group is a community and not a competition, a pleasure and not a rhythm , but I still don’t know if it’s for me.

We finally leave with Mariam at the front and a volunteer in a high visibility vest who takes the back. They have the route mapped out on their phones, which are mounted on their handlebars. Where the streets are wide and quiet, we are asked to overtake, take a priority position, ride near the center of the road where we can be seen more easily. Shazia is my partner. She tells me that she hasn’t been riding for that long, but that once her baby was old enough to be entrusted to her mother-in-law, she took the initiation to cycling course and then moved on to these intermediate rides. His smile is contagious and I feel satisfied that we managed to stay aligned without crashing.

There are 10 of us on this carousel and as we pedal to the entrance of the Olympic Park, an area I’ve never seen before even though it’s at my doorstep, a child points at us and says, “Look mum, so many .” I bravely pull a hand off the handlebars to wave at him, feeling a slight wobble in my frame.

Inside the park, we inadvertently spread out in a V-shape. Like a flock of birds, we swarm across the wide bridge. A pedestrian sees how much fun we have. “Who are you? Can I join?” she shouts behind our backs.

“Joy Riders. You can find us online,” the volunteer replies.

Something about our chatter and our laughter, the billowing of our clothes in the breeze reminds me The sound of music and the von Trapp family cycling scene. It reminds me of my favorite things: family, my sons, the youngest I wish could experience this kind of freedom.

Even though there is still a knot of sadness in my chest, I can feel it starting to loosen. After struggling for so long to get support and services, it’s important to have a chance to just sit in the saddle and be guided, to be told when to turn left or right, to not not have to be so hypervigilant.

We pass the London Aquatics Centre, an impressive venue designed by Iraqi-born architect Zaha Hadid for the 2012 Olympics and Paralympics, then stop at a cafe for coffee. One of the women in the group is doing a PhD on female cyclists, how we still outnumber men, and why. She asks us questions while we sip our drinks.

On the way home, I talk to Shabnam, a family doctor. She tells me how difficult it has been for her during the pandemic and it strikes me how little we know each other, how many assumptions we make and the danger of stereotypes. As if that weren’t enough to make you think, as we pedal down the greenway, it’s not a rider’s long jilbab that gets caught in the chain of her bicycle and immobilizes us all, but rather me. My jacket, which I had attached – somewhat haphazardly – ​​around my waist, is sucked into the spokes of my rear wheel. All women are waiting for me to be untangled. No JoyRider left behind.

When I come back home, I’m tired in a good way, in a way that will help me sleep. I know Tuesday mornings will be mine now. Weekends too, occasionally. I invite my friend of over three decades to join the group. On each ride, we stop and pose for a group photo with our bikes. I get the photos on our WhatsApp group, and the messages say things like, “Hey sisters, well done, great ride today.

My favorite ride with the group is at Brick Lane. Amid the colorful graffiti, the women show me where to buy the best samosas. I point out where my grandmother used to come for pickled herring, then we talk about me getting my own bike. Mariam and some of the sisters give advice. I want a hybrid. Gears are important, and a comfortable saddle. I tell the sisters how happy I am to be back in my neighborhood. What I know to be most important, however, is the change in my inner landscape, the opportunity to put the brakes on, to lean on the community and to ride towards joy.

Tanya Frank writes about the intersection of motherhood and mental health. His first memoir Zig Zag Boy: Motherhood, Madness and Letting Go will be published by HarperCollins in February 2023

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Residents demand better cycling infrastructure in North Belfast https://companyofcyclists.com/residents-demand-better-cycling-infrastructure-in-north-belfast/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 09:58:19 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/residents-demand-better-cycling-infrastructure-in-north-belfast/ A group of LOCAL residents have launched a campaign for better cycling infrastructure in North Belfast. The North Belfast Cycle Campaign brings together a range of everyday cyclists, including families who go to school and commuters who have come together to campaign for safe and well-integrated cycle paths in the region. A key initiative that […]]]>


A group of LOCAL residents have launched a campaign for better cycling infrastructure in North Belfast.

The North Belfast Cycle Campaign brings together a range of everyday cyclists, including families who go to school and commuters who have come together to campaign for safe and well-integrated cycle paths in the region.

A key initiative that prompted the group to form was the announcement of a protected cycle path on the Limestone and Cavehill roads as part of the Belfast Cycling Network Plan. Work is expected to begin on the Limestone Road section in the new year.

The main objectives of the Campaign are:

1) Support the development of the Cavehill Road / Limestone Road cycle path and connections to downtown and beyond.

2) Promote the benefits of active travel in North Belfast.

3) Connect with other cycling activists and advocate for active trips to Northern Ireland and beyond.

Clare Moore, one of the founders, has been campaigning for better cycling infrastructure in the region for 30 years.

“If you compare the cycling infrastructure in north Belfast to the south or the east, we are really underserved,” she explained.

“We want to correct this and believe it will help regenerate and improve this part of the city.

“I think there are a lot of people who would be interested in cycling but maybe too nervous, and I understand that.

“The way our roads are structured by the minute means it puts people in competition – drivers competing with cyclists and cyclists competing with walkers. It is such a shame.

“A protected cycling infrastructure is necessary so that people can make their first trip to the shops by bike. “

“The cycle path on the Limestone and Cavehill roads is a key route into the city center for schoolchildren, commuters and shoppers.

“We really want to see that built and help people travel by bike, which will have all kinds of benefits for our health and the environment.”

Last week the group met with local North Belfast SDLP MP and Infrastructure Minister Nichola Mallon.

Speaking afterwards, the Minister said: “I am delighted to be part of the launch of the North Belfast Cycle Campaign.

“I want to thank the group for their encouragement and support for better active travel routes in the city and look forward to working with them to build the Belfast Cycling Network.

“Groups like ‘North Belfast’ have a key role in promoting the ‘active travel’ message and I wish more groups that advocate cycling and active travel would generally come together in the city to help promote and spread the word about the benefits of walking, riding and cycling.

“Groups like this can also be of great support for people who are ready to consider leaving the car at home and becoming active in their daily commute. They are also of great support to my ministry by helping to develop better cycling infrastructure in their regions.

Do you have anything to say on this matter?
If so, why not send a letter to the editor via this link?


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Campaign by the North Belfast group to promote better cycling infrastructure in the region https://companyofcyclists.com/campaign-by-the-north-belfast-group-to-promote-better-cycling-infrastructure-in-the-region/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 01:26:13 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/campaign-by-the-north-belfast-group-to-promote-better-cycling-infrastructure-in-the-region/ RESIDENTS of North Belfast have come together to launch a campaign to promote and support better cycling infrastructure. The North Belfast Cycle Campaign was formed after Infrastructure Minister Nichola Mallon announced that a cycle path would be developed on Cavehill Road and Limestone Road. The group wants “safe and well-integrated cycle paths” and connections to […]]]>


RESIDENTS of North Belfast have come together to launch a campaign to promote and support better cycling infrastructure.

The North Belfast Cycle Campaign was formed after Infrastructure Minister Nichola Mallon announced that a cycle path would be developed on Cavehill Road and Limestone Road.

The group wants “safe and well-integrated cycle paths” and connections to the city center as well as the promotion of the benefits of active travel.

Clare Moore, one of the founders, has been campaigning for better cycling infrastructure for 30 years.

“If you compare the cycling infrastructure in north Belfast to the south or the east, we are really underserved,” she said.

“We want to correct this and believe it will help regenerate and improve this part of the city.

“The way our roads are structured by the minute means it puts people in competition – drivers competing with cyclists and cyclists competing with walkers. It is such a shame.

“A protected cycling infrastructure is necessary so that people can make their first trip to the shops by bike. “

Ms Moore said a cycle path on Limestone and Cavehill Roads would be a “key route into the city center for schoolchildren, commuters and shoppers”.

“We really want to see that built and help people travel by bike, which will have all kinds of benefits for our health and the environment,” she added.

The group met Ms Mallon, who said she was “keen on more groups that advocate cycling and active travel generally set up in the city to help promote and spread the message of the benefits of cycling. walking, cycling and cycling “.

“Groups like this can also be of great support for people who are ready to consider leaving the car at home and becoming active in their daily commute,” she said.


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City planner urges governments to improve Australia’s cycling infrastructure https://companyofcyclists.com/city-planner-urges-governments-to-improve-australias-cycling-infrastructure/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 23:40:43 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/city-planner-urges-governments-to-improve-australias-cycling-infrastructure/ To keep pace with the increase in the number of cyclists, e-bikes and e-scooters, and to meet Australia’s net zero goals, lead urban designer Andrew Brodie – of town planning and design firm Hatch RobertsDay – urges governments to dramatically improve cycling infrastructure in the Australian region urban areas declaring that the boom in electric […]]]>


To keep pace with the increase in the number of cyclists, e-bikes and e-scooters, and to meet Australia’s net zero goals, lead urban designer Andrew Brodie – of town planning and design firm Hatch RobertsDay – urges governments to dramatically improve cycling infrastructure in the Australian region urban areas declaring that the boom in electric mobility and cycling during COVID is putting immense stress on cycle lanes, main streets and city centers.

The COVID pandemic and the lockdowns that followed have encouraged a dramatic uptake in cycling. Australia’s bicycle imports grew 46% between fiscal 2019 and FY21, while e-bike imports are said to have increased 800% in the past five years.

Brodie notes that “Australia’s lack of safe and accessible cycling infrastructure means cyclists are often forced to share routes with pedestrians or cars. The councils favored quick fixes, such as painted cycle lanes with little protection for drivers from cars. Cycling networks are often not well planned, with lanes ending abruptly at dangerous intersections. The risk of accidents must be managed and imposes an urgent need to invest in safe cycling infrastructure and in the design of complete streets.

“In urban design, greater emphasis is placed on complete streets, which balance the needs of bicycles, pedestrians, transit, delivery vehicles and cars, while creating attractive destinations. Our recent Complete Streets projects represent a relatively inexpensive and high-value carbon reduction investment. “

While the health and environmental benefits of cycling are well documented, Brodie points out that there is also evidence of economic improvement resulting from increased use.

Brodie adds “some of the world’s most beloved cities, like Paris and Barcelona, ​​are reinventing themselves as privileged places for people, favoring pedestrians and bicycles over cars. Paris recently announced $ 386 million in funding to add 186 km of protected cycle paths and triple the number of bicycle parking spaces in the city.

In Australia, the cycling industry injected $ 6.3 billion into the Australian economy in 2020, with around a third of Australian adults spending on cycling-related goods and services, according to a new report. The report also pointed out that millions more would be contributed to the economy with improved cycling infrastructure, which would encourage Australians to ride more.

Brodie reveals six steps to improve Australia’s cycling infrastructure to become a world leader of bike-friendly cities.

1. Favor bicycles and pedestrians over cars. For too long, cars have been the priority mode of transport in Australia. To ensure a safer infrastructure that prioritizes low-carbon mobility, a 180-degree mindset shift is needed in the design, management and education around the movement network at all decision-making levels. It ranges from the structure and powers of state agencies to the many little things that add up to make a big difference.

2. Address security. Safety is the biggest obstacle causing hesitation in cycling. In fact, an estimated 69% of Australian bicycle consumers would be encouraged to ride more if there was an increased sense of safety when riding in traffic. The simple litmus test for any new cycling infrastructure should be: is it safe enough for a 7-year-old and their 70-year-old grandparents?

3. Fill in the gaps in the cycling network. Cash-strapped councils are often unable to make improvements to the cycling network, and trails often end abruptly or do not offer routes between home and key destinations, such as shops, schools, universities and public transport. These dangerous vulnerabilities in the network prevent people from commuting between home and work, school or stores. When cycle paths are easy to navigate and the number of well-connected cyclists will increase. Governments need to consider the larger cycling network and how the different LGAs intersect, as well as accommodating a mix of users, including routes for recreation and recreation, exercise and as a mode of transport.

4. Make protected cycle paths. Painted cycle lanes are the most basic level of infrastructure for the government, and they often lack protection against fast moving cars. Protected cycle paths separated by physical barriers like parked cars, a sidewalk or landscaping provide a buffer zone against busy roads. Evidence suggests that they also make roads safe for cars.

5.Use speed to dictate how the modes of transport mix. Often times, cyclists, and especially e-bikes and e-scooters, are forced to compete for space with pedestrians on already busy lanes. In Australia, electric bicycle motors are capped at 250 watts and the power cuts off when they reach 25 km / h. At such speed, they must be separated from pedestrians for safety reasons and accommodated on cycle lanes, protected cycle lanes and in streets where traffic is slow. When a cyclist is struck at 45 km / h or more, they have a 50% or less chance of surviving. But this increases up to a 90% chance of survival, if they are struck at 30 km / h.

6. Design of complete streets. Through thoughtful design, Complete Streets provides safe and accessible mobility for all modes of transport and all capacity levels, while beautifying public spaces with greenery and making them more vibrant and attractive. Hatch RobertsDay’s Complete Streets projects in Bondi Junction and Bankstown in Sydney and in the town of Vic Park in Perth offer a myriad of benefits. More active transportation helps reduce obesity and improve the mental health of residents, it increases the safety of cyclists and pedestrians, reduces carbon emissions and can stimulate economic growth by creating attractive places with more activities. of street.

Image: Concept for Hatch RobertsDay’s Complete Streets project. Courtesy robertsday.com.au/

Related Articles

December 10, 2021 – AusCycling’s Ride Nation program to receive $ 5 million in funding from the federal government

September 16, 2021 – ACT park rangers test power tools and electric bikes

July 7, 2021 – Lack of cycling infrastructure limits sustainable lifestyles and has an impact on public health

July 2, 2021 – Christchurch City Council seeks suppliers of e-bikes and e-scooters for public rental

June 3, 2021 – Australia imports record number of bikes

February 24, 2021 – Darwin improves signage for cycling network for fitness, recreation and tourism

January 14, 2021 – Bicycle maintenance station installed along the Rail Trail of Mont Gambier

October 8, 2020 – Melbourne city center city councils welcome funding for integrated cycling network

October 2, 2020 – The town of Fremantle celebrates WA Bike Month

August 27, 2020 – New bike lanes and upgrades planned in Brisbane

June 15, 2020 – 40 kilometers of new fast-track cycle paths in Melbourne

September 16, 2019 – Shoalhaven City Council supports NSW Bike Week

October 12, 2015 – Bicycle Network Announces New Women-Only Cycling Initiative

December 23, 2011 – Making Australia More Bike Friendly


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Cycling infrastructure saves taxpayers savings – Vancouver Island Free Daily https://companyofcyclists.com/cycling-infrastructure-saves-taxpayers-savings-vancouver-island-free-daily/ Sun, 12 Dec 2021 14:30:00 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/cycling-infrastructure-saves-taxpayers-savings-vancouver-island-free-daily/ LETTER: Cycling infrastructure saves taxpayers money Stan Bartlett compares the $ 4.09 million the City of Victoria plans to spend on road renewal in 2022 with the $ 13 million cost of the city’s cycle path network. This is misleading for a number of reasons. While the $ 4 million for roads is an annual […]]]>


LETTER: Cycling infrastructure saves taxpayers money

Stan Bartlett compares the $ 4.09 million the City of Victoria plans to spend on road renewal in 2022 with the $ 13 million cost of the city’s cycle path network. This is misleading for a number of reasons. While the $ 4 million for roads is an annual amount, the $ 13 million is spent over several years, and this follows many decades where governments at all levels have invested hundreds of millions of dollars in Victoria’s roads while spending next to nothing on cycling infrastructure.

The other thing Mr Bartlett fails to mention is that the $ 13 million cost for Victoria’s cycle paths was primarily funded, not by local property taxes, but by federal and provincial grants specifically. earmarked for cycling infrastructure and other green projects, and so on, cannot just be spent on roads instead.

According to a study for Metro Vancouver, an average five-kilometer drive costs the company $ 2.83 (on top of what the individual driver pays). For the same five-kilometer bike ride, there is a net saving to the government of $ 0.75 (mainly due to lower health care costs and reduced need to build expensive road infrastructure. for cars). If Mr. Bartlett really cared about taxpayers, you would think he would support the construction of more cycling infrastructure, as this translates into a net saving for the taxpayer.

Steven murray

Victoria





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Cycling infrastructure saves taxpayers money – Sooke News Mirror https://companyofcyclists.com/cycling-infrastructure-saves-taxpayers-money-sooke-news-mirror/ Sun, 12 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/cycling-infrastructure-saves-taxpayers-money-sooke-news-mirror/ LETTER: Cycling infrastructure saves taxpayers money Stan Bartlett compares the $ 4.09 million the City of Victoria plans to spend on road renewal in 2022 with the $ 13 million cost of the city’s cycle path network. This is misleading for a number of reasons. While the $ 4 million for roads is an annual […]]]>


LETTER: Cycling infrastructure saves taxpayers money

Stan Bartlett compares the $ 4.09 million the City of Victoria plans to spend on road renewal in 2022 with the $ 13 million cost of the city’s cycle path network. This is misleading for a number of reasons. While the $ 4 million for roads is an annual amount, the $ 13 million is spent over several years, and this follows many decades where governments at all levels have invested hundreds of millions of dollars in Victoria’s roads while spending next to nothing on cycling infrastructure.

The other thing Mr Bartlett fails to mention is that the $ 13 million cost for Victoria’s cycle paths was primarily funded, not by local property taxes, but by federal and provincial grants specifically. earmarked for cycling infrastructure and other green projects, and so on, cannot just be spent on roads instead.

According to a study for Metro Vancouver, an average five-kilometer drive costs the company $ 2.83 (on top of what the individual driver pays). For the same five-kilometer bike ride, there is a net saving to the government of $ 0.75 (mainly due to lower health care costs and reduced need to build expensive road infrastructure. for cars). If Mr. Bartlett really cared about taxpayers, you would think he would support the construction of more cycling infrastructure, as this translates into a net saving for the taxpayer.

Steven murray

Victoria




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