Cycling health effects – Company Of Cyclists http://companyofcyclists.com/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 22:26:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://companyofcyclists.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7-120x120.png Cycling health effects – Company Of Cyclists http://companyofcyclists.com/ 32 32 MGH expert responds to 100,000 overdose deaths – Harvard Gazette https://companyofcyclists.com/mgh-expert-responds-to-100000-overdose-deaths-harvard-gazette/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 21:33:03 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/mgh-expert-responds-to-100000-overdose-deaths-harvard-gazette/ The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently reported that the number of overdose deaths in the United States exceeded 100,000 for the first time in a 12-month period, ending in April. The grim milestone represents an increase of almost 30 percent from the previous 12-month period. Fentanyl, 100 times more potent than heroin, and […]]]>

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently reported that the number of overdose deaths in the United States exceeded 100,000 for the first time in a 12-month period, ending in April. The grim milestone represents an increase of almost 30 percent from the previous 12-month period. Fentanyl, 100 times more potent than heroin, and other synthetic opioids have been linked to the majority of deaths, and experts say COVID-related isolation and anxiety reversed pre-pandemic progress against opioid abuse.

The Gazette spoke with Sarah Wakeman, medical director of the Substance Use Disorders Initiative at Massachusetts General Hospital and Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School, about what can be done to save lives. The interview has been edited for clarity and length.

GAZETTE: What is fueling the increase in overdose deaths?

WAKEMAN: The crisis and its worsening are linked to several factors. One is the continued unpredictability and poisoning of the illicit drug supply. Increasingly, the drug supply is contaminated with fentanyl, and there is a lot of unpredictability in what people are consuming.

You can compare it to alcohol, for which we have a regulated supply. Of course, we always worry about alcohol use disorders and we identify and treat them. But if you go to a restaurant, bar, or store and drink alcohol, you know the alcohol level based on the volume of the product you consume. But imagine you order a drink and it could be 5% beer or 80 degree alcohol – that would be a huge difference, and you would have no idea how to regulate that.

GAZETTE: What about the effects of COVID?

WAKEMAN: An ongoing meta-problem, even before COVID, was this growing unpredictability of drug supply and the backdrop of decades of policy approaches that failed to support or adequately fund effective treatment or harm reduction interventions. to reduce overdose deaths. And then COVID came along and amplified things in a number of ways. First, it is the increase in trauma, social isolation, loss of economic opportunity, boredom, hopelessness, all of these factors that we know can increase chaotic substance use. It has also made it more difficult to access some of the treatments and resources that keep people safe. For example, many of the harm reduction interventions we recommend for people, such as never using alone or seeking treatment services, have become much more difficult in the days of COVID. And fundamentally, I think we are seeing the end result of years of unsuccessful policies and approaches to thinking about drug use and addiction and how we should address these complex public health challenges.

The other part that has been really crucial to note is the deepening racial disparities in the overdose crisis. In Massachusetts between 2019 and 2020, there was a 75% increase in opioid-related overdose deaths among black men. I think the public discourse has been that this problem only affects white communities. But the reality is that black communities are ravaged by overdoses, and the health harms of racism are increasingly evident in the overdose crisis. This is in addition to the fact that many of these communities have already been devastated by the failed and racist war on drugs, resulting in the separation of families by the child welfare system, people sent to prison, incarceration. instead of processing.

GAZETTE: Men aged 24 to 54 have been the most affected by the wave of overdoses. What is your response to this statistic?

WAKEMAN: I think these are young people with decades of life ahead of them, and I think about what went wrong: the supply strategies. This strategy is “just making it harder for people to get in” – a focus on opioid prescriptions, border crackdowns, increased funding for the DEA, and increased criminal prosecutions for drug-related charges – was totally ineffective. Yet that’s what we keep hearing about, even now in 2021, and that’s where our funding is headed.

I find a useful framing is “recovery from what to what?” What does someone really need in order to recover? And what is their hope for recovery in the future? If you are not housed, if you do not have a job, if you have gone back and forth through the criminal justice system, if you have been treated terribly by the systems, if you have been the victim of racism, if you have you have no hope for anything, why would you stop using drugs? Drugs are the only thing that will allow you to cope with this reality. And if you use drugs, what strategies can we implement that we know will reduce your risk of dying?


Source link

]]>
Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Strategies https://companyofcyclists.com/breast-cancer-risk-reduction-strategies/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 18:04:42 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/breast-cancer-risk-reduction-strategies/ Posted: 11/27/2021 13:01:47 PM Modified: 11/27/2021 13:00:12 With one in eight women developing breast cancer in their lifetime, many wonder what they can do to lower their risk. A panel of specialists from Concord Hospital recently discussed breast cancer risk factors and risk reduction strategies. What are the risk factors for developing breast cancer? Having […]]]>

Posted: 11/27/2021 13:01:47 PM

Modified: 11/27/2021 13:00:12

With one in eight women developing breast cancer in their lifetime, many wonder what they can do to lower their risk. A panel of specialists from Concord Hospital recently discussed breast cancer risk factors and risk reduction strategies.

What are the risk factors for developing breast cancer?

Having breasts is the number one risk factor for breast cancer; however, men can get it too. Overall, women have about a 12% chance of developing breast cancer, but that number may be higher for certain groups. Some factors that increase your risk are old age, a family history of breast or ovarian cancer, a previous diagnosis of breast cancer, and BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations. While we have no control over some factors, others, such as diet and lifestyle, can be changed to reduce our risk.

What can be done to reduce the risk for people with a history or family history or genetic mutations?

There are both pharmaceutical and surgical options to reduce the risk of breast cancer in patients who are at a significantly higher risk of developing breast cancer.

Two major classes of drugs are available; selective estrogen receptor modulators and aromatase inhibitors. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (such as tamoxifen and raloxifene) can reduce the risk of developing invasive breast cancer by 50%. They have the potential to cause side effects such as hot flashes, endometrial cancer, deep vein thrombosis, or stroke. Aromatase inhibitors (Arimidex, Femara or Aromasin) are also effective and have a better side effect profile. They are reserved for postmenopausal women. Premenopausal women can only take tamoxifen or raloxifene.

Surgical options include oophorectomy, removal of both ovaries; and mastectomy, removal of the breast (s). Oophorectomy only decreases the risk of breast cancer in patients with BRCA mutations, and mastectomy is a serious surgical procedure with the potential for both physical and psychological complications. The American Society of Breast Surgeons’ Choosing Wisely campaign contains a wealth of information from many specialists, including breast cancer surgeons, to help patients and their physicians determine which treatment is best for them ( choosingwisely.org).

What Kind of Diet Should Women Follow to Reduce Their Risk of Breast Cancer?

Women should choose what is called an abundance model over a deprivation model. It just means that the focus needs to be on a balance and a variety of healthy choices and generous portions rather than calorie counting and the ‘don’t’ and ‘shouldn’t’ rules, which leave us with a sense of. guilt and demoralization. To be successful in maintaining or achieving a healthy body weight, it needs to be a lifestyle goal, not just the calories in and out. Women should follow a herbal diet for optimal health. This does not necessarily mean vegan, but rather a diet with lots of vegetables, fruits, herbs and spices, nuts, seeds, whole grains, high fiber beans, healthy fats and plant proteins. such as tofu or tempeh. Sugary drinks should be limited, opt instead for water, seltzer water or teas. Alcohol should also be limited or avoided altogether.

What exercise works best for reducing the risk of breast cancer?

Active women have a 25 percent decrease in breast cancer risk compared to sedentary women. Exercise also reduces the risk of breast cancer recurrence as well as a variety of other health problems and illnesses. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) recommend that healthy adults between the ages of 18 and 65 do moderate-intensity aerobic exercise for 30 minutes a day for five days. per week and weight training twice a week. . Moderate exercise is considered to be at 55 to 75% of an individual’s maximum heart rate. The activity can be work, recreational, walking / cycling, household chores or other forms, although recreational activities or walking / cycling have been shown to be more effective in reducing the risks than other forms of movement. High Intensity Intermittent Training (HIIT) has become popular because it can reduce the amount of time it takes to exercise. Regardless of what is chosen, the activity should be changed every six weeks to better stimulate your body.

What are the environmental risk factors and how can women reduce their exposure?

We interact with the environment and can be exposed to toxins by breathing the air, ingesting and absorbing the skin. Behavior and lifestyle can increase or decrease your exposure to environmental toxins, including carcinogens and endocrine disrupting chemicals. Carcinogens are natural or manufactured substances known to cause cancer. Endocrine disrupting chemicals mimic, block, or interfere with hormones in the body’s endocrine system. Many chemicals are both carcinogens and endocrine disruptors, such as BPA, flame retardants, and pesticides. Smoking, alcohol consumption, the use of certain personal care products, the consumption of certain types of food, cleaning and cooking practices, and indoor air quality are all factors that we can modify or largely control. To reduce your risks, keep your air clean, watch what you eat and drink, think about what is happening on your skin, minimize the use of plastic and tin cans, use safe cleaning products, do not use pesticides and always read the ingredients. . Remember the adage “when in doubt, do without.

Dr Sharon Gunsher from Concord Hospital (Concord Surgical Associates), Dietitian / Nutritionist Megan Ryder (Payson Center for Cancer Care), Physiotherapists Austri Monette and Barbara Baker (Rehabilitation Services) were joined by Deborah de Moulpied from Anticancer Lifestyle Program for Breast Cancer Risk Factors and Reduction Strategies Present at the October Concord Hospital Trust “What’s Up Doc? Donor Lecture Series. The monthly series, supported by the Walker Lecture Fund, features Concord Hospital medical staff speaking to Concord Hospital Trust donors on new and innovative medical treatments and services. You can watch the panel presentation on Concord Hospital’s YouTube channel at: youtube.com/concordhospital.


Source link

]]>
Your health: when sugar turns sour https://companyofcyclists.com/your-health-when-sugar-turns-sour/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 19:38:05 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/your-health-when-sugar-turns-sour/ November 14 was World Diabetes Day. On that day, we tried to remember the 63 million adults diagnosed with diabetes and the 230 million who don’t know they have the disease. Almost 73 million diabetics live in India. In total, 10-14% of the urban population and 5-7% of the rural population are affected. India is […]]]>

November 14 was World Diabetes Day. On that day, we tried to remember the 63 million adults diagnosed with diabetes and the 230 million who don’t know they have the disease. Almost 73 million diabetics live in India. In total, 10-14% of the urban population and 5-7% of the rural population are affected.

India is the diabetes capital of the world. A similar percentage of ethnic Indians living abroad also suffer from the disease. This is because the majority of Indians, even those of normal weight, have a high degree of insulin resistance. Mitochondria in cells, which are responsible for converting food into energy, do not work efficiently. This leads to high sugar values.

Many remain in denial even after diagnosing diabetes. Advised by well-meaning people, they decide that a controlled diet isn’t really necessary, only refined sugar qualifies as sugar, and swallowing bitter leaves, herbs and vegetables will cure them.

Uncontrolled diabetes causes death – by stroke, heart attack, and kidney failure – due to the side effects of high blood sugar. Complications such as blindness and non-healing ulcers can also occur.

Everyone should be tested for diabetes after the age of 45. Previously, screening tests were essential for symptomatic individuals.

The HBA1c or glycosylated hemoglobin test does not require overnight fasting. A value less than 5.7 is normal; 5.7-6.4 corresponds to prediabetes; 6.5 or more, or a random test value of 200 mg / dL or more, or a fasting sugar greater than 100 mg / dL is considered diabetes.

Once blood sugar values ​​are elevated, the tests should be repeated to see if they return to normal after a trial of diet and exercise. These two elements are the mainstays of diabetes treatment.

There is no single diet for people with diabetes. Basically, one should have three main meals and two healthy snacks per day. Meal times should be regular and fixed. Total calorie intake should be 1,500 to 1,700, depending on your activity level. Second portions should be avoided. Cooking oil should be reduced to half a liter per person per day. Diet can be adjusted according to personal preferences and needs by consulting a dietitian.

Regular exercise helps increase your heart rate, works muscles, uses calories, and lowers blood sugar levels. It is important to use a combination of exercises. A half hour ‘gentle walk’ a day will not be enough, but it is better than nothing.

Aerobic activity – walking, jogging, swimming or cycling – for at least 40 minutes per day is required six days per week. During extended periods of inactivity throughout the day, get up every hour for a few minutes to keep the muscles moving.

Training with light weights builds muscles and also helps control blood sugar. It is not necessary to purchase dumbbells. A one liter bottle of water weighs one kilogram. Thirty repetitions per day are usually sufficient.

Blood sugar can be monitored inexpensively using home blood glucose monitors.

A file must be kept and shown to the doctor. If the control is not satisfactory, the lowest possible dose of a single drug is started and increased to the maximum dose if this does not help. If the sugar is still not controlled, a second or third drug is added. If nothing works, insulin injections are needed.

Some medications have side effects such as vitamin B12 deficiency, nausea, and diarrhea. They are unique to medicine and to the individual. In this case, the drug should be changed. People with diabetes should also have their blood pressure, eyes, kidney function, and ECG reports regularly monitored.

The author is a pediatrician with a family practice in Vellore and the author of Staying Healthy in Modern India. If you have any questions about health issues, please write to yourhealthgm@yahoo.co.in


Source link

]]>
GoFundMe for 6-year-old Irish cancer patient https://companyofcyclists.com/gofundme-for-6-year-old-irish-cancer-patient/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 22:02:45 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/gofundme-for-6-year-old-irish-cancer-patient/ 6-year-old Danny Norris was first diagnosed with high-risk stage 4 neuroblastoma in July 2020, forever changing his life and that of his family as their journey to childhood cancer began. Since his diagnosis, Danny has endured months and months of treatment, and on one occasion his parents Lar and Lisa Norris feared the worst when […]]]>

6-year-old Danny Norris was first diagnosed with high-risk stage 4 neuroblastoma in July 2020, forever changing his life and that of his family as their journey to childhood cancer began.

Since his diagnosis, Danny has endured months and months of treatment, and on one occasion his parents Lar and Lisa Norris feared the worst when his body began to die from an infection.

Fortunately, the treatment Danny received seems to be working, but has a high relapse rate of 60%. If Danny relapses, he can’t undergo the same treatment again and he has only a 10% chance of survival the second time around, which is a startling statistic for his family.

Danny Norris.

Danny’s parents are now hoping their son will have access to a bivalent vaccine trial at Memorial Sloan Kettering Hospital (MSK) in New York City next year. The vaccine aims to reduce the chances of Danny’s neuroblastoma coming back.

The new trial is actively accumulating and lasts for five years. If eligible, Danny would receive 14 shots of the vaccine: seven in the first year, four in the second year, and one in the third, four, and five years.

This state-of-the-art treatment is currently not available in Ireland and is not funded by health insurance or the HSE. The family appealed to the Ministry of Health for help in this matter.

The treatment costs a staggering 380,000 € and the Norris family must raise the funds themselves over the next four months.

To help the Norris family access potentially life-saving treatment for Danny, a GoFundMe has been launched, which has so far reached less than a third of its goal of € 380,000.

Danny Norris.

Danny Norris.

Lisa, Danny’s beloved mom, said: “Since the diagnosis, life has changed dramatically not just for Danny, but for us as a family.

“A typical day may involve blood pressure checks, medications, injections, blood tests and transfusions. Danny experienced pain and discomfort, along with all of the side effects typically associated with chemotherapy. , but he rarely complains.

“Unfortunately, due to Danny’s susceptibility to infections, there were times when almost all activity had to be based indoors. This was a big change as Danny is generally a very active little boy who enjoys playing outdoors, go for a walk, ride a bike, and bounce on the trampoline.

“Danny had to stay in isolation at Crumlin for almost nine weeks earlier this year. We were residents in the transplant unit for Valentine’s Day, St. Patrick’s Day and Easter. Danny’s older brother, Shay, celebrated his 8th birthday at Ronald McDonald House, waving to his brother through the hospital window. “

Lisa notes how proud she and Lar are of their three adapted sons. “The prolonged and unexpected periods of separation have been particularly difficult for the three boys and the high levels of uncertainty they now face on a daily basis have been a real adjustment for all of them.

“The Covid pandemic has further complicated the situation for the boys because it means that when Danny is hospitalized there cannot be visits due to the current restrictions. “

Lisa adds, “As parents we strive daily to keep things as ‘normal’ as possible, but there is nothing normal or right about childhood cancer. It stole the boys. [Danny and his brothers Charlie, 10, and Shay, 8] of their previously carefree existence and made them members of an exclusive club, one that no one wants to join.

“There have been times when we have wondered why us? But why not us? The reality is that anyone’s life can change in the blink of an eye.

“It’s definitely not easy, or something we expected to happen to us, but it happened. The boys are great and we make sure there are lots of fun and happy times too. . “

Danny still has a tough battle ahead of him with several medical mountains to climb. You can support the Norris family and their journey to get treatment for young Danny here through GoFundMe or you can email Dream4Danny@gmail.com.


Source link

]]>
Covid vaccines can only affect menstrual cycles of women on contraception, study finds https://companyofcyclists.com/covid-vaccines-can-only-affect-menstrual-cycles-of-women-on-contraception-study-finds/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 17:25:54 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/covid-vaccines-can-only-affect-menstrual-cycles-of-women-on-contraception-study-finds/ Covid vaccines can only affect the menstrual cycles of women on contraception, suggests the first British study on the phenomenon. Thousands of vaccinated women have complained of irregular periods after receiving the vaccine, with some postmenopausal women even claiming that it triggered vaginal bleeding. But there has been no clear evidence of a link, although […]]]>

Covid vaccines can only affect the menstrual cycles of women on contraception, suggests the first British study on the phenomenon.

Thousands of vaccinated women have complained of irregular periods after receiving the vaccine, with some postmenopausal women even claiming that it triggered vaginal bleeding.

But there has been no clear evidence of a link, although similar problems can arise with vaccines for other diseases.

Now researchers at Imperial College London believe they might have an answer after studying 1,200 women.

They found no definitive link between women receiving the jab and experiencing changes in the menstrual cycle.

But women who took birth control such as the pill were more likely to have heavier or lighter periods than normal, compared to those who did not.

This was the case with the three vaccines used in the rollout in Britain – AstraZeneca, Pfizer and Moderna.

The graphs above show the proportion of women who reported that their period was early, one-time, or late after receiving a Covid vaccine (blue bars) and that it was heavier, the same, or lighter than usual (bars red). Groups are divided by menstrual cycles in women who were not using contraception (marked as cycle) and using contraception (marked as hormonal contraception). They suggest that women who used contraception were more likely to have heavier or lighter periods after being vaccinated compared to those who were not.

The graphs above show the proportion of women who reported the timing (blue bars) or flow (red bars) of their menstrual cycle by medical condition.  It shows that those with endometriosis may be more likely to have an earlier period than usual, and those with PCOS may be more likely to have a later period than usual.

The graphs above show the proportion of women who reported the timing (blue bars) or flow (red bars) of their menstrual cycle by medical condition. It shows that those with endometriosis may be more likely to have an earlier period than usual, and those with PCOS may be more likely to have a later period than usual.

The results showed that among people on contraception, 42% said their periods were heavier than usual and 19% found it was lighter.

For comparison, for those who don’t use the devices, 32% said they were heavier and 14% said they were lighter. The difference was statistically significant.

Anthropologist says her period came soon after Moderna’s Covid jab

Anthropologist Dr Kate Clancy, from the United States, is one of many women who say they have had period problems after receiving the Covid vaccine.  She said that after receiving her first dose of Moderna, her period came a day earlier and was stronger than normal.

Anthropologist Dr Kate Clancy, from the United States, is one of many women who say they have had period problems after receiving the Covid vaccine. She said that after receiving her first dose of Moderna, her period came a day earlier and was stronger than normal.

Dr Kate Clancy, a medical anthropologist from Illinois, is one of many women who say they had period problems after receiving the Covid vaccine.

She said in February that after receiving her first dose of the Moderna vaccine, her period came a day earlier.

“I am on the third day of my period and still exchange extra long sanitary pads several times a day,” she wrote on Twitter.

“What is typical for me right now is maybe one or two regular pads (albeit extra absorbent, the ones from Always Infinity) for the whole day.”

The results also showed that patients with endometriosis – a disease in which the tissue lining the uterus grows in the ovaries – were much more likely to have an earlier-than-normal period compared to those who did. no disease.

And those with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) – when the ovaries stop releasing eggs – were more likely to have a later period than others.

Dr Victoria Male, the immunologist who led the study, admitted that it was “difficult” to suggest a biological reason why women on contraception were more likely to have period problems.

She said the results may actually be due to women taking the pill monitoring their menstrual cycles more closely than others.

The pill can also trigger period changes.

Dr Male told MailOnline: “A lot of people who take hormonal contraception want to at least partially control their periods.

“They may be more likely to report the change because contraception normally makes their periods very regular – so this is particularly unusual for them.

‘The other possibility [that vaccines are changing periods] are we seeing a weak signal that some with PCOS may be more likely to have a late period.

The study – published as a pre-print on medRxiv – requested data from 1,273 women who kept a record of their menstrual cycle when they were vaccinated.

The group was between 29 and 39 years old.

The Pfizer vaccine was given to most participants (61 percent), followed by the AstraZeneca jab (27 percent) and the Moderna vaccine (10 percent).

Some 134 volunteers used hormonal contraception during the study, and 1,117 said they did not. The types of contraception deployed included the pill, implants, a patch, and a vaginal ring.

Some 87 participants suffered from PCOS and 60 from endometriosis.

Experts said the sample size was large enough to determine whether the vaccines affect the menstrual cycle.

But they added that larger studies in the United States would be able to observe rarer impacts vaccines have on menstruation, which their study was too small to detect.

Experts have already suggested that the immune response triggered by vaccines could also affect periods because the two systems are strongly linked.

Some pregnant women and those who wish to have a baby have been reluctant to come forward because of concerns about vaccines and fertility.

But experts insist the changes are transient in nature and there is no evidence that they are causing the problem.

Dr Male added: “Most women don’t seem to see an effect and most potentially vulnerable people should still get the jab because, in the short term, we know getting a Covid infection affects menstruation as well.

“In this study, some 36 women got pregnant out of the 2,000 involved, so that’s a lot.”

Separate studies have also been published in America to determine if Covid jabs could be the cause of changes in the menstrual cycle.

But they have also so far been unable to detect an impact on the periods that vaccines might have.

More than 41,000 menstrual changes have been reported by women to the country’s vaccine regulatory body after their inoculation.

The MHRA says it is reviewing the reports, but there is not yet strong evidence that these are certain side effects of the vaccine.


Source link

]]>
Rejected Dragons’ Den inventor on track for £ 3million turnover this year https://companyofcyclists.com/rejected-dragons-den-inventor-on-track-for-3million-turnover-this-year/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 16:33:50 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/rejected-dragons-den-inventor-on-track-for-3million-turnover-this-year/ Exclusive: Tom de Pelet is proof the Dragons don’t always get it right after finding his Hornit bike horn idea rejected by Deborah Meaden, Duncan Bannatyne, Piers Linney, Peter Jones and Kelly Hoppen Tom de Pelet filmed Dragons’ Den in 2013 A cyclist who invented ‘the loudest bicycle horn in the world’ is now a […]]]>

Exclusive:

Tom de Pelet is proof the Dragons don’t always get it right after finding his Hornit bike horn idea rejected by Deborah Meaden, Duncan Bannatyne, Piers Linney, Peter Jones and Kelly Hoppen

Tom de Pelet filmed Dragons’ Den in 2013

A cyclist who invented ‘the loudest bicycle horn in the world’ is now a multi-million pound business owner – though he was dismissed from Dragons’ Den.

Tom de Pelet, 43, filmed the reality show in 2013 where he introduced his Hornit product to Deborah Meaden, Duncan Bannatyne, Piers Linney, Peter Jones and Kelly Hoppen.

But despite leaving without an offer, Tom, who lives in Exeter, has seen his business grow more and more and is now expected to hit £ 3million in sales this year.

Tom said he was inspired to design the Hornit horn after spending seven years commuting to London while working as a lawyer.

The first product launched in 2011 was the dB140 – the world’s loudest bicycle horn that allows cyclists to alert distracted drivers.







Tom said he wanted to make the roads safer for cyclists



At 140 decibels, the Hornit can be heard by drivers over the noise of a radio and city sounds.

However, the business got off to a bumpy start after the first production of 3,000 horns was delayed by 11 months and was immediately found to be 80% defective.

“This was despite going to China and signing golden samples after years of sampling and development,” said Tom, who had used £ 51,000 of his own savings to fund the business.

“It took the plant an additional seven months to deliver replacement units.

“By the time the replacement units arrived in July 2012, I was on my knees mentally and there was hardly any money left.

“I had important orders to fill, so I was able to continue. “







Dragons’ Den stars Kelly Hoppen, Duncan Bannatyne, Deborah Meaden, Peter Jones and Piers Linney



Tom took Hornit to Dragons’ Den in 2013 and spent a grueling hour and a half having his idea questioned by business moguls – despite only being shown on TV for 10 minutes.

He said his biggest fear was tripping during the opening speech or being ridiculed on national television while his friends watched.

He added: “This part was the most scary. One minute they ask you an easy generic question and then suddenly you have to remember one of the, in my case, 53 digits in my head.

“If you’re wrong you know that’s what they’ll show because it’s good for ratings.

“In the end the pitch went well and despite the best efforts of Peter Jones and Deborah Meaden to catch up with me on the numbers, it all stacked up.

“By the time I was in the den I had an order for £ 80,000 from Walmart for the Hornit Mini, a second product I had created which is a lighting and sound effects accessory for bicycles. and children’s scooters.








The Hornit horn can be heard by drivers over the noise of a radio
(

Picture:

Hornit)



“I also had several international distributors. It gave me the confidence to believe in what I was doing. “

Although he left the lair with no investment, Tom said he was congratulated by the Dragons and left the set “more or less unscathed”.

Two of the Dragons also asked to keep the samples he presented during the show, he said.

Before Tom appeared on the show, he had spoken to an angel investor who then invested £ 100,000 in the business after Dragons’ Den.

“It was disappointing that we didn’t get an offer, but other than that it went as well as I could have hoped,” said Tom.

“I had planned to continue regardless of the outcome at The Den.








Hornit has extended to products other than horns
(

Picture:

Hornit)



“I really believe riding a bicycle horn is a lifeline and with the controls I had I was hoping I could make it work financially.”

Fortunately, things turned out well for Tom – despite the consecutive bankruptcy of several vendors he worked with in 2015.

This cost him tens of thousands of pounds and meant the £ 1.2million he was on track to making a turnover several years ago was not possible.

But Hornit has slowly recovered over the years.

The lockdown in particular has given a huge boost due to the increased number of people biking locked out, and the company has expanded its product line to include helmets, racks and lights.

International success has also helped.

Global export sales alone hit £ 1million after Tom broke into the Australian market.

Have you started a successful small business and want to share how you did it? Let us know: mirror.money.saving@mirror.co.uk


How I started my business



Hornit expects to reach just over £ 3million in revenue this year, followed by £ 4.5million in 2022 and £ 6.3million in 2023.

“In 2019, our website and Amazon combined sales were less than 4% of the business, now they are 57%,” Tom said.

“It’s a virtuous circle because we are able to take better care of our customers than if they were buying from a third party and this is valuable for long-term growth.

“When your customers like you, they come back and tell everyone they know.”

But Tom is still grateful for his time on Dragons Den and says it gave him the launch pad to market his company name.

“The show gave my business the boost I was hoping for,” he said.

Hornit’s success comes as Australia and the UK struck a free trade deal in June 2020, which is expected to boost industries that employ 3.5 million people in the UK.

Paul Shand, Head of Trade at the South West Department of International Trade, said: “Hornit’s success in Australia demonstrates the strong demand for high quality British products overseas.

“It’s great to see them thrive at a time when cycling and other physical activities have become so important to our mental health.


Read more




Read more




Source link

]]>
High cholesterol: vitamin D deficiency linked to higher risk https://companyofcyclists.com/high-cholesterol-vitamin-d-deficiency-linked-to-higher-risk/ https://companyofcyclists.com/high-cholesterol-vitamin-d-deficiency-linked-to-higher-risk/#respond Mon, 08 Nov 2021 10:40:17 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/high-cholesterol-vitamin-d-deficiency-linked-to-higher-risk/ High cholesterol refers to the presence of fatty molecules that circulate in the blood and deposit on the artery walls, causing them to become blocked. Although it is usually harmless at first, the disease can wreak havoc on the body if left untreated. Researchers continue to uncover some of the different risk factors for the […]]]>

High cholesterol refers to the presence of fatty molecules that circulate in the blood and deposit on the artery walls, causing them to become blocked. Although it is usually harmless at first, the disease can wreak havoc on the body if left untreated. Researchers continue to uncover some of the different risk factors for the disease. While some foods should be avoided at all costs, other foods that contain a key vitamin can reduce the risk of high cholesterol.

Vitamin D is essential for well-being, with a plethora of studies highlighting its role in the immune system and bone health.

But the sunshine vitamin, so called because it is produced in the body by the action of sunlight, also has strong associations with cholesterol.

According to Heart UK, the body needs cholesterol in its skin cells to make vitamin D from the sun.

“Vitamin D is then further processed in the liver and kidneys, but cholesterol is needed for the first step,” says Heart UK.

READ MORE: Hypercholesterolemia: Doctors Name and Shame “Foods High in Cholesterol” to Avoid

To date, meta-analyzes have shown that people with lower vitamin D levels are more likely to have high cholesterol dyslipidemia.

Dyslipidemia refers to an abnormal level of cholesterol and other lipids, also called fats, in the blood.

But while researchers have found a correlation between the two conditions, no “cause and effect” relationship has been established.

The term generally describes an excess of triglycerides in the blood and therefore covers more than LDL, or “bad” cholesterol.

DO NOT MISS :

This association between vitamin D deficiency and dyslipidemia was illustrated in a 2018 study, published in the journal Current Medical Research and Opinion.

The researchers wrote: “Vitamin D deficiency is associated with dyslipidemia in a cohort of 3788 subjects, serum 25 (OH) D is inversely correlated with LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and positively correlated with HDL cholesterol levels. .

Despite overwhelming evidence highlighting the essential role of vitamin D in the body, levels remain exceptionally low in the UK and other countries.

Healthline writes: “Vitamin D deficiency is very common. It is estimated that around one billion people around the world have lower blood levels of the vitamin. In addition, vitamin D levels have reportedly fallen further due to the pandemic.

However, when the nutrient cannot be obtained by exposure to the sun, it must come from the food.

Good sources of vitamin D include oily fish, beef liver, and fortified products like grains, soy milk, and orange juice.

How to avoid high cholesterol

It is well known that diet is of the utmost importance in helping to lower blood lipids within a healthy range.

Certain foods high in soluble fiber can lower cholesterol by binding to fat molecules and pushing them out of the body.

All fruits, vegetables and legumes and good sources of soluble fiber.

Equally important in managing illness is exercise, with running, walking, cycling and swimming all having promising effects.

Plus, researchers believe exercise may help raise HDL, or good cholesterol.

According to the Mayo Clinic, “Moderate physical activity can help raise high-density cholesterol (HDL).” With your doctor’s approval, get at least 30 minutes of exercise five times a week or vigorous aerobic activity for 20 minutes three times a week. “


Source link

]]>
https://companyofcyclists.com/high-cholesterol-vitamin-d-deficiency-linked-to-higher-risk/feed/ 0
Stronger climate action urged at COP26 to avoid “unimaginable” health risks https://companyofcyclists.com/stronger-climate-action-urged-at-cop26-to-avoid-unimaginable-health-risks/ https://companyofcyclists.com/stronger-climate-action-urged-at-cop26-to-avoid-unimaginable-health-risks/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 20:17:00 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/stronger-climate-action-urged-at-cop26-to-avoid-unimaginable-health-risks/ Health risks linked to climate change are increasing Linking work on mitigation, adaptation and health could help UK NHS among healthcare systems poised to cut own emissions GLASGOW, November 6 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – From extreme heat to worsening hunger and water shortages, accelerating climate change threatens “unimaginable” health consequences, scientists and health officials on […]]]>
  • Health risks linked to climate change are increasing
  • Linking work on mitigation, adaptation and health could help
  • UK NHS among healthcare systems poised to cut own emissions

GLASGOW, November 6 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – From extreme heat to worsening hunger and water shortages, accelerating climate change threatens “unimaginable” health consequences, scientists and health officials on the sidelines of the UN climate talks at COP26 in Glasgow.

As with the COVID-19 pandemic, “it won’t be long before the entire world population is affected, directly or indirectly,” said former Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard, now head of the charity British Health Wellcome Trust.

But a large number of possible changes – from making it easier to cycle and walk in cities to changing diets and the rise of renewables – could together curb global warming, protect health, and improve people’s lives. billion people, experts said.

Achieving these changes will require not only investment and effort to make the health benefits clearer, but also, crucially, the integration of people who do not normally work on health issues.

With enormous influence on air pollution and the way people choose to travel, for example, “the Minister of Transport is probably more of a Minister of Health than the Minister of Health,” noted Richard Smith, chairman of the UK Health Alliance on Climate Change.

Too often, efforts to reduce emissions, adapt to climate threats and address health issues are conducted separately, but “we need these people to work together for integrated solutions,” said Andy Haines of the London School. of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

This could include things like adding more trees and water-absorbing green spaces to poor areas of cities, to tackle both inequality, flooding and heat risks, while also strengthening nature and improving mental health.

“The solutions are the same for the climate, our health and our biodiversity,” said Rayan Kassem, regional director for West Asia for Youth4Nature, a green nonprofit focused on climate and natural solutions.

AIR POLLUTION

Climate change is already the root of various health threats around the world, said Haines, professor of environmental change and public health.

For example, the ranges of insect-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue are shifting as weather conditions change, and heat deaths are increasing rapidly, more than a third of those recorded between 1990 and 2018 being attributed to climate change, he said.

The increase in the number of forest fires, floods, droughts and extreme heat is also having “truly devastating effects” on mental health, alongside the concerns many people have about the future with the worsening of the disease. climate change, Haines said.

As permafrost melts in the rapidly warming Arctic, it could even expose “Methuselah organisms” – bacteria and viruses long frozen and potentially deadly, he said.

“As we release them, we don’t know what’s going to happen to human health,” he said.

But some health risks linked to climate change are already well known.

Air pollution, largely linked to the use of fossil fuels, kills an estimated 7 million people a year, said Diarmid Campbell-Lendrum, who heads the climate and health unit of the World Organization. health.

A major step towards reducing this risk would be removing what the International Monetary Fund says is $ 5.9 trillion in direct and indirect subsidies to the fossil fuel industry each year, making artificially polluting fuels cheaper, did he declare.

“We have to stop spending money on the bad things and start spending it on the good things,” said Campbell-Lendrum, an avid cyclist who has ridden 1,600 km to the top of Glasgow from Geneva.

Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah, whose nine-year-old daughter Ella died in London in 2013 from a severe asthma attack that coroners attributed to “excessive air pollution,” told conference attendees that “breathing clean air is a human right”.

The United Nations Human Rights Council first adopted a resolution in October recognizing access to a healthy and sustainable environment as a universal right.

Poornima Prabhakaran, deputy director of the Center for Environmental Health at the Public Health Foundation of India, said air pollution also had “huge social and economic costs” for her country, which is home to 15 of the 20 most polluted cities in the world.

“This crisis is real,” she said. “We don’t want a cosmetic answer … We want real, tangible action.”

People who are already disadvantaged and less able to prepare for, respond to and recover from the impacts of climate change will be the most affected, warned Susan Aitken, head of Glasgow City Council.

“This is as true here in a city like Glasgow as it is on a global scale,” she said.

NHS GREENER?

As they search for ways to limit growing health threats, doctors and hospitals are also looking for ways to reduce their own emissions.

Nick Watts, sustainability manager for Britain’s National Health Service (NHS), said the $ 120 billion a year service accounts for around 5% of UK greenhouse gas emissions – roughly the same as a country like Denmark or Croatia.

To help meet Britain’s goal of cutting emissions by 78% by 2035, the service has set an initial one-year target to phase out emissions equivalent to those used to fuel 1.1 million homes in the country every year.

This involves things like making buildings more energy efficient, asking suppliers to meet NHS net zero targets, and reducing transport emissions from the service itself and its users through changes such as more appointments. you online.

The NHS ‘first zero-emission ambulance, currently being tested in Birmingham, is also parked at the COP26 site in Glasgow.

“This will be the future of healthcare in this country and everywhere else,” Watts said at the conference.

Jeni Miller, executive director of the Global Climate and Health Alliance, stressed that many other national climate plans must take into account threats to health – and that reducing emissions will be key to reducing those risks.

“The decisions taken at COP26 will define the health and well-being of people (…) for years to come,” she said.

Reporting by Laurie Goering @lauriegoering; edited by Megan Rowling. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters. Visit http://news.trust.org/climate

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


Source link

]]>
https://companyofcyclists.com/stronger-climate-action-urged-at-cop26-to-avoid-unimaginable-health-risks/feed/ 0
Shell promotes sustainable urban solutions https://companyofcyclists.com/shell-promotes-sustainable-urban-solutions/ https://companyofcyclists.com/shell-promotes-sustainable-urban-solutions/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 14:21:05 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/shell-promotes-sustainable-urban-solutions/ As the economy slowly recovers from the adverse effects of the pandemic, the country needs efficient and active multimodal transport systems that will help businesses and communities operate efficiently and sustainably, industry leaders said. . During the Future Festival, a four-part series launched by Pilipinas Shell Petroleum Corp. (PSPC) which tackles the pillars essential to […]]]>

As the economy slowly recovers from the adverse effects of the pandemic, the country needs efficient and active multimodal transport systems that will help businesses and communities operate efficiently and sustainably, industry leaders said. .

During the Future Festival, a four-part series launched by Pilipinas Shell Petroleum Corp. (PSPC) which tackles the pillars essential to the nation’s progress, transport sector leaders highlighted mobility challenges such as insufficient access to public transport, weak infrastructure and outdated policies. To address this, they looked at urban planning, sustainability and innovative solutions based on efficiency, public safety, thoughtful planning and collaboration.

Speaking at the online forum, Randy del Valle, vice president and general manager of mobility for PSPC, said: “Mobility is not just about transportation. whether it’s traffic, urbanization, the need for safer roads and public transport, or the long-term effects of the pandemic – we need many solutions, not just one. ” Deputy Transport Secretary Mark Steven Pastor, an advocate for active transport, said his organization was seeking to expand the country’s pre-existing 500 kilometers of “cycle lane networks in metropolitan cities with the aim of increasing accessibility to areas of ‘key activity and fundamental facilities, significantly reducing carbon as well as promoting road safety. “He said the Ministry of Transport is also exploring improving the mobility of conventional vehicles through dedicated lanes for The public utility vehicle movement project, said Pastor, is a “large-scale transformational initiative of this administration that is structured, modern, well managed and environmentally sustainable. Drivers have a stable, sufficient and dignified livelihood while commuters get to their destinations safely. and comfortably. ”Additionally, as travel slowly picks up, National Capital Region (NCR) Department of Tourism Director Woodrow Maquiling Jr. said“ greenways have been put in place ”. With the support of the national government and more flexible health protocols, these will allow the entry of fully vaccinated people into the country for business or leisure. Maquiling added that this initiative will lead to “boosting commercial activity and to provide employment opportunities while ensuring security against the spread of Covid-19, “he said.

“Cycling” towns

Beyond the locality, Kevin Punzalan, Senior Policy Officer of the Netherlands Embassy in the Philippines, shared his ideas based on the strategies and best practices of the Dutch who have pioneered some of the most “cities” cyclables ”in the world.

“Cycling cities are better designed for people, make transportation accessible and affordable, and create a healthier and safer city,” Punzalan said, noting that more funding and government policies are needed to ensure safety and mobility. efficient cyclists and pedestrians.

Keisha Mayuga, Head of the Safe Walking and Cycling Transportation Program at Move As One, said, “The top three barriers preventing people from taking active transportation are the lack of cycle paths, bicycle parking and bicycle parking. of facilities after the trip to their destinations ”. For his part, Felino “Jun” Palafox Jr., principal architect and founder of Palafox Associates, stressed that the country’s urban planning initiatives in terms of mobility “are a hundred years behind.” Safety is also a vital factor which mobility must be taken into account, he noted.

“Town planning [in the country] is always looking for supply and demand for traffic, ”Palafox added. “EDSA works like eight roads: main artery, minor artery, access roads, and so on. This is why the traffic [is congested]On a related note, Bill Luz, president of Liveable Cities Challenge Philippines, cited the lack of urban planning experts who can help cities and municipalities establish their own sustainable systems and improve road safety in the city. local communities.


Source link

]]>
https://companyofcyclists.com/shell-promotes-sustainable-urban-solutions/feed/ 0
FASTer Way to Fat Loss® Launches Improved Mobile App to Facilitate Wellness https://companyofcyclists.com/faster-way-to-fat-loss-launches-improved-mobile-app-to-facilitate-wellness/ https://companyofcyclists.com/faster-way-to-fat-loss-launches-improved-mobile-app-to-facilitate-wellness/#respond Wed, 03 Nov 2021 16:02:11 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/faster-way-to-fat-loss-launches-improved-mobile-app-to-facilitate-wellness/ The All New FASTer Way Fat Loss App “We’ve helped 215,000 people recover, find energy and reach their goals by following our leading fitness and nutrition strategies. Now, we make the pursuit of good health even easier by consolidating all of our resources into one convenient app. CLEARWATER, Florida (PRWEB) 03 November 2021 FASTer Way […]]]>

The All New FASTer Way Fat Loss App

“We’ve helped 215,000 people recover, find energy and reach their goals by following our leading fitness and nutrition strategies. Now, we make the pursuit of good health even easier by consolidating all of our resources into one convenient app.

FASTer Way to Fat Loss®, the first health, fitness and weight loss program on the market, has launched a new app for customers that will enhance its six-week online bootcamp program with personalized macros, food diaries, recipes, workouts and more all at your fingertips.

“We’ve helped 215,000 people recover, find energy and reach their goals by following our leading fitness and nutrition strategies. Now, we make the pursuit of good health even easier by consolidating all of our resources into one convenient application, ”said Amanda Tress, Founder and Creator of the FASTer Way to Fat Loss Program.

The new application eliminates the need for customers to synchronize information from other data tracking sites. Instead, the FASTer Way to Fat Loss app upgrade now has all-in-one features like:

  • A proprietary macro calculator to track carbohydrates, protein and fat as well as calories, fiber and micronutrients
  • A food journal with meal guides and weekly recipes
  • A verified food database for faster fat loss with an easy search function
  • A timer for intermittent fasting reminders
  • A calculator to track daily water consumption
  • A workout library with 30-minute daily workouts
  • A digital studio with bonus workouts including HIIT, strength, Kettlebell, cycling, sit-ups, and travel workouts

“We know life is hectic, and balancing work and home may leave little room for investing in ourselves. There is no time to log into different apps and websites to track health goals and set new ones, and we hope these FASTer Way to Fat Loss app updates provide a quick way and easy for women and men to take control of their health, ”Tress said.

The FASTer Way to Fat Loss method combines key science-based nutrition and exercise strategies that deliver wellness benefits such as balanced blood sugar and hormone levels, decreased inflammation, and reduced inflammation. better overall health to help fight disease.

In addition to the carbohydrate cycle, intermittent fasting, and macronutrient tracking, the FASTer Way incorporates strategic workouts that maximize the effects of a well-matched nutritional plan.

Once clients complete the six-week online program, they upgrade to VIP membership and gain access to additional features in the app, as well as opportunities to work 1: 1 with a team of professionals. Wellness, including Head Coaches and FASTer Way Health Coaches.

The FASTer Way to Fat Loss app is now available for iPhone and Android and can be downloaded from online stores where apps are purchased for your device.

For more details on the program, visit fastwaytofatloss.com. For media inquiries only, contact Lindsey Murray, lindsey@fasterwaytofatloss.com.

About FASTer Way to Fat Loss

The premier national health and fitness program was established in 2016 by wife, mother and entrepreneur Amanda Tress. Starting with just 11 participants in the first six-week online bootcamp, the program has now served more than 215,000 clients through key nutrition and training strategies, including carb cycling, intermittent fasting and macro tracking, and also offers a certification program for coaches. FASTer Way to Fat Loss © was named one of the fastest growing countries in Tampa Bay, Florida by the Tampa Bay Business Journal and is on the Inc. 5000 list. The program has also been featured in National publications such as Forbes, USA Today, Bon Appétit and iHeart Radio.

About Amanda Tress

Amanda Tress is a wife, mother, motivational speaker, and founder and creator of the FASTer Way to Fat Loss program. She is a certified nutrition coach, strength and conditioning coach, and personal trainer. During her time at the gym, Amanda saw the frustration clients felt when they did all the right things but didn’t see the changes they wanted. That’s when she got down to work fine-tuning her cutting edge nutrition and workout strategies to create the FASTer Way to Fat Loss ©. The program has now helped more than 215,000 people transform their lives by improving their health and well-being.

Share the article on social media or by email:


Source link

]]>
https://companyofcyclists.com/faster-way-to-fat-loss-launches-improved-mobile-app-to-facilitate-wellness/feed/ 0