public transport – Company Of Cyclists http://companyofcyclists.com/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 04:00:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://companyofcyclists.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7-120x120.png public transport – Company Of Cyclists http://companyofcyclists.com/ 32 32 Is air pollution in the London Underground harming your health? https://companyofcyclists.com/is-air-pollution-in-the-london-underground-harming-your-health/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 04:00:14 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/is-air-pollution-in-the-london-underground-harming-your-health/ Every weekday, the London Underground sees up to five million passengers on and off its network. Its 11 lines serve 272 stations and, at peak times, more than 500 trains run under the streets of London. Despite its constant use since the 19and Century, the London Underground has been relatively little studied. While other modes […]]]>

Every weekday, the London Underground sees up to five million passengers on and off its network. Its 11 lines serve 272 stations and, at peak times, more than 500 trains run under the streets of London.

Despite its constant use since the 19and Century, the London Underground has been relatively little studied. While other modes of transportation have been researched and updated accordingly – think back to the days when we didn’t have seatbelts in cars or airbags – the sprawling tube system has remained in large party the same.

The pandemic has given Transport for London (TfL), which runs the Tube, the opportunity to make some improvements. The ventilation systems have been evaluated and according to the 2021 Mayor’s Transportation Strategy Update “London Underground’s ventilation infrastructure is generally designed beyond legal minimum requirements with an adequate supply of fresh air.”

But how cool is the air you breathe in the tube?

“The air, even before it arrives in the subway, is not perfectly pure,” explained Dr David Green, who leads the aerosol science team at Imperial College London and is a member of the UK Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollution (COMEAP). Green is also part of a group commissioned by TfL to regularly assess COVID-19 risk on the Tube.

“Urban background air already has a low level of particulate matter, but on top of that you have all these additional emissions [coming from the tube].

Learn more about air pollution:

These include particles from the carriage moving along the rails, brake pads rubbing on the wheels, and the electrical connection between the collector plate and the live rail.

“So you have iron rubbing on steel, steel on steel, iron and copper, and barium coming from brakemen,” Green says. “There is lubricant on the wheels and it contains things like carbon and molybdenum. These metal compounds are found in the atmosphere [on the Underground].”

There are also particles that come from the tube passengers, humans and others. Hair and skin cells, plastic fibers from clothing, and animal particles from creatures that live underground all contribute to air quality.

Some particles are large enough to be caught by the hairs of our nose and throat, preventing them from entering our lungs and causing damage there. These are usually referred to as PMten; particles less than 10 micrometers in diameter, or about 0.01 mm.

The smallest particles less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter are called PM2.5, and these are the ones that can penetrate deep into the lungs and can also enter the bloodstream to be carried around the body, affecting the brain, heart and other organs. These are about 3 percent of the diameter of a human hair.

“We don’t have enough evidence to say categorically whether or not pollution on the tube is harmful to your health, but we do know that exposure to PM2.5 is harmful. [This is shown by] studies from around the world looking at deaths and hospital admissions, and studies of smaller groups of people, including those with existing health conditions.

“However, dust in subway systems is quite different from PM2.5 in the outdoor air and we don’t know if we can extrapolate these results to the metro environment. We are therefore currently studying vulnerable groups of people and TfL staff to understand if exposure to this type of PM2.5 is harmful. »

© Shutterstock

In addition to these small particles, there are also gaseous pollutants in the air, including ozone, O3and nitrogen dioxide, NO2. All are monitored by the UK Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whose 2020 publication revealed there had been a long-term reduction of all pollutants measure.

However, UK values ​​for PM2.5 are even higher than the guidelines established by the World Health Organizationwhich have recently changed their goal for an average annual exposure not exceeding 5 micrograms per cubic meter (μg/m3). Previously it was 10 μg/m3. The European Union limit is 25 μg/m3which is also the limit set by UK law.

“The new WHO guideline is very difficult and currently I don’t think any place in the UK will respond to this,” says Green. A 2020 UK government study found that four of the top five urban environments with largest annual PM2.5 values ​​were located in London, South East or East England Regions. According to the latest COMEAP study, the concentrations of PM2.5 in the London Underground were several times greater than in other London transport environments, and greater than in other underground systems worldwide.

However, when it comes to air quality in the subway, Green says it’s important to consider context across the range of transportation modes. A report in 2021 compared the PM2.5 averages through the metro, bus, car, the three types of trains, cycling and walking.

Interestingly, the lowest exposures were seen on electric and hybrid trains, even when compared to cycling and walking – although this was not the case when these trains were in stations next to motor trains diesel.

“[Travelling on the tube] for one hour every weekday for 48 weeks a year (assuming 4 weeks holiday) on the Victoria Line would increase your annual PM exposure2.5 6.8 μg/m3“says Green. This increase is in addition to the usual exposure of individuals to pollutants in the air, which varies by location, as some of the small particles measured in PM2.5 occur naturally, like dust and sea salt.

“This compares to 0.3 μg/m3 at a background site in London, 2.6 μg/m3 on an average London Underground line or 1.2 μg/m3 in a car. But remember that the car also pollutes everyone.

London Underground passengers on the escalator

©Getty Images

For Green, this is the key. “It’s much better for people to take the London Underground than to get in their car to get around London. Indeed, if you are sitting in your car, you are exposed to very high concentrations of automotive pollutants.

“You’re sitting directly behind the car’s exhaust [in front], you are therefore more exposed than cyclists traveling along the road or pedestrians passing in front of it. And the other thing is that you also pollute the world for everyone. So while the car is no worse than the tube in the case of PM2.5it is much worse for other pollutants such as nitrogen oxides.

For those who need to travel by metro, it is then a question of choosing the best route. Green’s research found that deeper lines are generally worse, like the Northern line, compared to higher level lines like the Circle, District, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines. The age of the lines and the type of trains used all play a role. So, Green suggests opting for newer lines and stations that have platform gates installed to reduce exposure. “But in general, there’s not a lot of choice,” he admits.

Green is also concerned about the health of London Underground staff, who are spending far more time on the tube or in a station. Unfortunately, there is not yet enough data to say what the long-term health effects will be.

“We are working closely with Transport for London (TFL) to compare the sickness absence of people working on the London Underground with other TFL workers. We also want to look at the pension data, to see if the people who work on the tube may die a little earlier than the others. Corn [these studies] are in the early stages at the moment.

Subway passengers can be reassured that the risk of catching COVID-19 is however minimal throughout the subway.

“Tube trains and stations are cleaned with hospital grade cleaning substances which kill viruses and bacteria on contact and provide ongoing protection,” a TfL spokesperson said. BBC Science Focus magazine.

“Independent testing by Imperial College London has been carried out monthly since September 2020, taking swabs from touchpoints at stations, on buses and air samples from ticketing halls and up to the last round of tests verified in December 2021 found no trace of coronavirus on the public transport network. »

About our expert

Dr David Green is a senior researcher at Imperial College London, where he leads the aerosol science team. His research focuses on particles in the air and their effects on the health of populations.

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The scientific case for abolishing fast food drive-thru has nothing to do with obesity https://companyofcyclists.com/the-scientific-case-for-abolishing-fast-food-drive-thru-has-nothing-to-do-with-obesity/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 08:00:25 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/the-scientific-case-for-abolishing-fast-food-drive-thru-has-nothing-to-do-with-obesity/ Drive-in – services that allow people to order and collect food and drink without having to leave their car – are designed with convenience in mind. Whether it’s blisteringly hot, uncomfortable cold, or we’re just in a hurry, drive-thru has become very appealing in an age characterized by a desire to immediacy. In the UK, […]]]>

Drive-in – services that allow people to order and collect food and drink without having to leave their car – are designed with convenience in mind. Whether it’s blisteringly hot, uncomfortable cold, or we’re just in a hurry, drive-thru has become very appealing in an age characterized by a desire to immediacy.

In the UK, where there are approximately 2,000 passes at the wheelit is not uncommon to see queues of vehicles meandering with drivers waiting their turn to pass, pay and collect their orders.

In fact, drive-thru is on an upward trajectory in the UK. 41 percent increase the number of drive-ins between 2015 and 2020, and 12% of sales in fast food restaurants and coffee chains were made through their drive-thru sites in the year to March 2021: 50% more than pre-Covid figures.

This service has become essential for many. Drive-thru services offer benefits to people with limited mobility as well as those with very busy schedules or people who argue with young children. In the United States, even some banks and pharmacies offer drive-thru options. And by helping customers avoid eating indoors, drive-thrus may also have helped limit the spread of Covid-19. But drive-ins come at a cost.

First, drive-thrus require excessive idling, which is banned on public roads in the UK, but regularly and casually in queues at the wheel. In addition to increasing emissions, waste fuel and damaging enginestailpipe emissions associated with idling create local air pollution with serious environmental and health consequences.

Poor air quality is already a widespread problem in the UK, where more than two-thirds of local authorities infringe air quality objectives. Even if we were to achieve these goals, the Royal College of Physicians warned that only a fraction of incidences of air quality-related illnesses – including lung cancer, asthma attacks and overall reduced life expectancy – would be avoided. Currently, air pollution causes 40,000 dead per year in the UK, with annual costs to the NHS of over £20 billion ($27.2 billion).

In light of the current situation transition towards electric vehicles, environmental concerns related to idling will decrease. The UK project to phase out sales of internal combustion engines will also reduce tailpipe emissions as we head towards 2050.

Yet even so, emissions from brake wear and tire wear are respectively responsible for 16 to 55 percent and five to 30 percent non-tailpipe emissions in UK cities. This means that air pollution and its health effects will not be completely solved by switching to electric cars.

Drive-through: the end result

Cities around the world have started cracking down on drive-thrus, despite renewed investment following the pandemic.

Some regions of Canada and the United States have already banned or restricted new drive-ins, while cities like Glasgow are beginning to consider following suit. As the UK attempts to reduce the number of car owners and use, drive-ins will also inevitably be discouraged.

Curbing the expansion of drive-thru will not seriously affect UK restaurant revenues: especially given their relatively small market share considering that 70 percent of fast food sales in the United States are made through drive-thru. However, the negative implications of the “drive-thru culture” have deeper roots.

Car-centric transport planning has dominated urban development in the UK since the World War II. It has increased congestion and contributed to public health issues such as the effects of poor air quality and increasing incidence of obesity by cutting the share of journeys via more environmentally friendly options such as public transport, cyclingand while walking.

In many countries, the huge space reserved for cars could be used to improve health and well-being.Antonio Silveira/Flickr

Urban development that prioritises cars is also incompatible with the UK government’s aims to improve well-being, food systemsand public health. Instead, build cities with wider sidewalks, separate bike lanes, and widespread public transport – where we can reduce our addiction about cars and fast food – represents the healthy urban future that experts suggest that we should try to create.

And for those with mobility or childcare issues, the growth of smartphone apps enabling delivery from restaurant to car outside the drive-thru makes it easy and safe for people to pick up food without having to wait in line. Food delivery apps whose cyclists use bikes can also help reduce car trips while maintaining convenience.

As a society, we need to reflect on the profoundly negative effects of living in a society that has become so time pressed that we cannot afford to get out of our cars to get food, let alone to Eat it.

Fundamentally, drive-ins are symptomatic of a way of life we ​​need to move away from – for the good of our planet. Limiting them to the UK would be a sign of progress not only for the environment but also for our society.

This article was originally published on The conversation by Eugene Mohareb at the University of Reading and Sybil Derrible at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Read it original article here.

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Budget cuts threaten London’s cycling infrastructure https://companyofcyclists.com/budget-cuts-threaten-londons-cycling-infrastructure/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 13:00:10 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/budget-cuts-threaten-londons-cycling-infrastructure/ If you are a cyclist living in London or planning to tour the city and see it by bike, be aware that cycling in the city may soon be more dangerous as planned improvements to the city’s cycling infrastructure may have to be reversed. because there won’t be any money for it. London Mayor Sadiq […]]]>

If you are a cyclist living in London or planning to tour the city and see it by bike, be aware that cycling in the city may soon be more dangerous as planned improvements to the city’s cycling infrastructure may have to be reversed. because there won’t be any money for it.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan has announced that the city’s roads will become more dangerous for cyclists if road safety programs are scrapped, as the UK government has cut funding to Transport for London (TfL), the body local responsible for maintaining the city’s cycling and walking infrastructure. TfL faces a huge budget shortfall and has also warned of massive cuts to bus, tube and road services if its funding is cut. The agency also said discussions with the government were continuing in its attempt to secure long-term financial assistance.

Providing safer cycling conditions would help local authorities reduce pollution by encouraging more people to cycle. © Profimedia

One of the main reasons for TfL’s revenue shortfall is reduced public transport fare revenue due to the Covid pandemic. This suggests that other cities planning improvements to cycling infrastructure could suffer the same fate for the same reason. TfL’s current emergency bailout deal with the government was due to expire on February 4, but the deal has been extended for two weeks. If there is no deal before this deadline, TfL’s Healthy Streets budget, which is for cycling and walking projects, will face a forced cut of £473million and have a budget shortfall of £1.5 billion by 2024-25.

To keep its budget viable, TfL has made emergency proposals which include scrapping walking and cycling schemes, as well as ending its Direct Vision scheme to protect vulnerable road users from lorries. Khan said this would have serious consequences for planned improvements in road safety and force TfL to adopt a policy of “managed decline” as further infrastructure projects will be shelved. “The bad news is that the managed decline not only means that we cannot progress at the rate that cyclists want, but that we will not be able to preserve the junctions that we have. [improved]“Khan told the Evening Standard.

Failure to improve cycling infrastructure could also prevent people from cycling for recreation or commuting. According to a recent Australian survey, the lack of proper cycling infrastructure, with cycle lanes physically separated from traffic, prevents people, even those who own bicycles, from cycling as much as they want. Nick Bowes, chief executive of the Center for London think tank, said encouraging walking and cycling was “crucial” if London was to have safer streets, cleaner air and less congestion. “If we are to have any chance of achieving these goals, it is crucial that more people walk and cycle for shorter journeys,” he said. “But it will be all the more difficult if the budget for Transport for London’s Healthy Streets is reduced. Without a funding regulation, we will struggle to build safe, well-designed routes that help people walk and cycle more.

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Calls for improved cycling infrastructure on Ravenhill Road https://companyofcyclists.com/calls-for-improved-cycling-infrastructure-on-ravenhill-road/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 22:10:06 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/calls-for-improved-cycling-infrastructure-on-ravenhill-road/ A call has been made to improve the cycling infrastructure on Ravenhill Road to improve transport for the growing community in the area. Green Party Councilor Brian Smyth has written to the Infrastructure Minister asking for the South Belfast route to be included in Belfast’s cycle network plans, believing it could become a popular active […]]]>

A call has been made to improve the cycling infrastructure on Ravenhill Road to improve transport for the growing community in the area.

Green Party Councilor Brian Smyth has written to the Infrastructure Minister asking for the South Belfast route to be included in Belfast’s cycle network plans, believing it could become a popular active travel corridor for this part from the city.

He says that currently Ravenhill Road suffers from a lack of public transport, with no buses available on Sundays, and is considered the ‘poorer relation’ of neighboring Ormeau Road and Cregagh.

With plans for a new bridge over the Lagan River from Ormeau Park to the Gasworks, Councilor believes the time is right to plan a new designated cycle route for the area which would improve residents’ access to the center -city.

Speaking to Belfast Live, Councilor Smyth said: “Ravenhill Road is a growing and vibrant area which is becoming more popular every year, but it lacks the transport infrastructure that residents need.

“Public transport is poorly served even if it has become a very attractive place to live.

“With the glider proposed for Ormeau Road this could mean that designated cycling infrastructure may not be able to be put in place there leaving Ravenhill Road as the best option available and I believe it could become a very successful active travel corridor.

“Currently there is space on the road to put the infrastructure in place and with a lower slope than Ormeau Road, this could be an ideal location for a cycle path which would also serve the areas of Ormeau and of Cregagh.

“Together with the plans for the new bridge to the gasworks, it creates a perfect route that would make it much easier for people to get around the city without having to use a car.

“Belfast has become far too dependent on the car and we need the infrastructure in place to encourage people to use other modes of transport which will not only improve congestion around the city but reduce emissions and will improve the health and well-being of all who live here.”

A spokesperson for the Ministry of Infrastructure said: “Last year, Minister Mallon published ‘ Making Belfast an active city – Belfast Cycling Network 2021 ‘. This document, which provides a blueprint for a radical change in cycling infrastructure in Belfast over the next 10 years, includes a proposal for a safe cycle route on Ravenhill Road and other proposals within Lisnasharragh. The Department is currently working on a delivery plan for the Belfast cycle network and this will set out timelines for the delivery of the various programs in the network.

Minister Mallon has set up a blue/green infrastructure fund, to fund these active travel schemes and this year has committed £13.5 million in capital funding from this fund for active travel schemes being set up implemented by the department and by the councils. The Minister remains fully committed to increasing opportunities for active travel as an important measure to help address the climate emergency.

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Climate Change and Health – Jammu Kashmir Latest News | Tourism https://companyofcyclists.com/climate-change-and-health-jammu-kashmir-latest-news-tourism/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 19:01:55 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/climate-change-and-health-jammu-kashmir-latest-news-tourism/ Dr Richa Mahajan,Dr Rajiv K Gupta Climate change is a critical public health problem which, in addition to introducing new parasites and pathogens into communities, exacerbates many existing diseases and conditions. Climate change indicates an increase in sea surface temperature, an increase in the severity of extreme weather events, a rise in sea level, melting […]]]>


Dr Richa Mahajan,
Dr Rajiv K Gupta

Climate change is a critical public health problem which, in addition to introducing new parasites and pathogens into communities, exacerbates many existing diseases and conditions. Climate change indicates an increase in sea surface temperature, an increase in the severity of extreme weather events, a rise in sea level, melting glaciers, a decrease in air quality and an increase greenhouse gas emissions. We still have not been able to forget the devastating effects of the Kashmir floods (2014), the Uttarakhand flash floods (2013) and the tsunami (2004). The southern states of Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh have witnessed flood-like situations due to heavy rains in recent times. Whether in the Western Ghats or the Himalayas, states have compelling reasons to address and mitigate their climate-related vulnerabilities. The Madhav Gadgil committee in 2011 recommended that a section of approximately 130,000 km² covering Gujarat, Karnataka, Kerala, Maharashtra and Tamil Nadu be declared an environmentally sensitive area, but the recommendations have yet to be declared. been accepted despite enormous loss of wealth and lives. .
The direct and indirect health consequences of such a global imbalance include diseases related to excessive heat, vector-borne and water-borne diseases, increased exposure to environmental toxins, and exacerbation of cardiovascular and respiratory diseases due to the decline air quality. The most vulnerable people – children, the elderly, the poor and those with underlying co-morbidities – are at increased risk of health effects from climate change. Between 2030 and 2050, climate change is expected to cause an additional 250,000 deaths per year, due to malnutrition, malaria, diarrhea and heat stress.
To mitigate and adapt to climate change, the Prime Minister’s Council on Climate Change (PMCC), India released the National Climate Change Action Plan (NAPCC) with eight missions in June 2008. In 2015 , India’s response to climate change has been broadened by introducing four new missions including “Health”. The proposed “health mission” will address the health-related aspects of climate change through a multi-pronged approach. As a result, the National Action Plan for Climate Change and Human Health (NAPCCHH) was prepared in 2018 with the aim of strengthening health services against the adverse effects of climate change on health. The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MoHFW) approved the National Program on Climate Change and Human Health (NPCCHH) under the National Health Mission (NHM) in February 2019. Currently, the three main focus areas of the NPCCHH are air pollution, heat-related illnesses and building green and climate-resilient health facilities.
Prime Minister Narendra Modi also presented five nectar elements, ‘Panchamrit’, to tackle the challenge of climate change at the COP26 summit in Glasgow:
* India will increase its non-fossil energy capacity to 500 GW by 2030.
* India will meet 50% of its energy needs from renewable energies by 2030.
* India will reduce total projected carbon emissions by one billion tonnes by 2030.
* By 2030, India will reduce the carbon intensity of its economy by less than 45%.
* By 2070, India will meet the Net Zero target.
The promotion of renewable energy by the Indian government is a strong commitment to climate change. We can also help reduce the effects of climate change by making small changes in our way of life such as:
* Replace old appliances with energy efficient models and bulbs / LEDs.
* Save electricity by turning them off completely when not in use, including your computer.
* Reduce, reuse and recycle waste.
* Plant more trees.
* Promote the use of public transport and active travel (walking, cycling, etc.).
* Use renewable energies. If you have the possibility, install solar panels in your home.
* Bring your own bag when shopping.
* Use a refillable water bottle and a coffee mug. Reduce waste.
Rising global temperatures, record levels of greenhouse gas emissions and the growing impacts of climate change require urgent and measurable action from everyone.


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City planner urges governments to improve Australia’s cycling infrastructure https://companyofcyclists.com/city-planner-urges-governments-to-improve-australias-cycling-infrastructure/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 23:40:43 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/city-planner-urges-governments-to-improve-australias-cycling-infrastructure/ To keep pace with the increase in the number of cyclists, e-bikes and e-scooters, and to meet Australia’s net zero goals, lead urban designer Andrew Brodie – of town planning and design firm Hatch RobertsDay – urges governments to dramatically improve cycling infrastructure in the Australian region urban areas declaring that the boom in electric […]]]>


To keep pace with the increase in the number of cyclists, e-bikes and e-scooters, and to meet Australia’s net zero goals, lead urban designer Andrew Brodie – of town planning and design firm Hatch RobertsDay – urges governments to dramatically improve cycling infrastructure in the Australian region urban areas declaring that the boom in electric mobility and cycling during COVID is putting immense stress on cycle lanes, main streets and city centers.

The COVID pandemic and the lockdowns that followed have encouraged a dramatic uptake in cycling. Australia’s bicycle imports grew 46% between fiscal 2019 and FY21, while e-bike imports are said to have increased 800% in the past five years.

Brodie notes that “Australia’s lack of safe and accessible cycling infrastructure means cyclists are often forced to share routes with pedestrians or cars. The councils favored quick fixes, such as painted cycle lanes with little protection for drivers from cars. Cycling networks are often not well planned, with lanes ending abruptly at dangerous intersections. The risk of accidents must be managed and imposes an urgent need to invest in safe cycling infrastructure and in the design of complete streets.

“In urban design, greater emphasis is placed on complete streets, which balance the needs of bicycles, pedestrians, transit, delivery vehicles and cars, while creating attractive destinations. Our recent Complete Streets projects represent a relatively inexpensive and high-value carbon reduction investment. “

While the health and environmental benefits of cycling are well documented, Brodie points out that there is also evidence of economic improvement resulting from increased use.

Brodie adds “some of the world’s most beloved cities, like Paris and Barcelona, ​​are reinventing themselves as privileged places for people, favoring pedestrians and bicycles over cars. Paris recently announced $ 386 million in funding to add 186 km of protected cycle paths and triple the number of bicycle parking spaces in the city.

In Australia, the cycling industry injected $ 6.3 billion into the Australian economy in 2020, with around a third of Australian adults spending on cycling-related goods and services, according to a new report. The report also pointed out that millions more would be contributed to the economy with improved cycling infrastructure, which would encourage Australians to ride more.

Brodie reveals six steps to improve Australia’s cycling infrastructure to become a world leader of bike-friendly cities.

1. Favor bicycles and pedestrians over cars. For too long, cars have been the priority mode of transport in Australia. To ensure a safer infrastructure that prioritizes low-carbon mobility, a 180-degree mindset shift is needed in the design, management and education around the movement network at all decision-making levels. It ranges from the structure and powers of state agencies to the many little things that add up to make a big difference.

2. Address security. Safety is the biggest obstacle causing hesitation in cycling. In fact, an estimated 69% of Australian bicycle consumers would be encouraged to ride more if there was an increased sense of safety when riding in traffic. The simple litmus test for any new cycling infrastructure should be: is it safe enough for a 7-year-old and their 70-year-old grandparents?

3. Fill in the gaps in the cycling network. Cash-strapped councils are often unable to make improvements to the cycling network, and trails often end abruptly or do not offer routes between home and key destinations, such as shops, schools, universities and public transport. These dangerous vulnerabilities in the network prevent people from commuting between home and work, school or stores. When cycle paths are easy to navigate and the number of well-connected cyclists will increase. Governments need to consider the larger cycling network and how the different LGAs intersect, as well as accommodating a mix of users, including routes for recreation and recreation, exercise and as a mode of transport.

4. Make protected cycle paths. Painted cycle lanes are the most basic level of infrastructure for the government, and they often lack protection against fast moving cars. Protected cycle paths separated by physical barriers like parked cars, a sidewalk or landscaping provide a buffer zone against busy roads. Evidence suggests that they also make roads safe for cars.

5.Use speed to dictate how the modes of transport mix. Often times, cyclists, and especially e-bikes and e-scooters, are forced to compete for space with pedestrians on already busy lanes. In Australia, electric bicycle motors are capped at 250 watts and the power cuts off when they reach 25 km / h. At such speed, they must be separated from pedestrians for safety reasons and accommodated on cycle lanes, protected cycle lanes and in streets where traffic is slow. When a cyclist is struck at 45 km / h or more, they have a 50% or less chance of surviving. But this increases up to a 90% chance of survival, if they are struck at 30 km / h.

6. Design of complete streets. Through thoughtful design, Complete Streets provides safe and accessible mobility for all modes of transport and all capacity levels, while beautifying public spaces with greenery and making them more vibrant and attractive. Hatch RobertsDay’s Complete Streets projects in Bondi Junction and Bankstown in Sydney and in the town of Vic Park in Perth offer a myriad of benefits. More active transportation helps reduce obesity and improve the mental health of residents, it increases the safety of cyclists and pedestrians, reduces carbon emissions and can stimulate economic growth by creating attractive places with more activities. of street.

Image: Concept for Hatch RobertsDay’s Complete Streets project. Courtesy robertsday.com.au/

Related Articles

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July 7, 2021 – Lack of cycling infrastructure limits sustainable lifestyles and has an impact on public health

July 2, 2021 – Christchurch City Council seeks suppliers of e-bikes and e-scooters for public rental

June 3, 2021 – Australia imports record number of bikes

February 24, 2021 – Darwin improves signage for cycling network for fitness, recreation and tourism

January 14, 2021 – Bicycle maintenance station installed along the Rail Trail of Mont Gambier

October 8, 2020 – Melbourne city center city councils welcome funding for integrated cycling network

October 2, 2020 – The town of Fremantle celebrates WA Bike Month

August 27, 2020 – New bike lanes and upgrades planned in Brisbane

June 15, 2020 – 40 kilometers of new fast-track cycle paths in Melbourne

September 16, 2019 – Shoalhaven City Council supports NSW Bike Week

October 12, 2015 – Bicycle Network Announces New Women-Only Cycling Initiative

December 23, 2011 – Making Australia More Bike Friendly


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Toronto’s cycling infrastructure gets a failing grade from defenders https://companyofcyclists.com/torontos-cycling-infrastructure-gets-a-failing-grade-from-defenders/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/torontos-cycling-infrastructure-gets-a-failing-grade-from-defenders/ Toronto’s cycling infrastructure gets a failing grade in a new report from a coalition of cycling advocates. The newsletter-style report, released Nov. 18, is the result of a survey of 215 kilometers of cycle paths across the city, conducted by volunteer urban cyclists for seven weeks in fall 2021. This survey by the Toronto Community […]]]>


Toronto’s cycling infrastructure gets a failing grade in a new report from a coalition of cycling advocates.

The newsletter-style report, released Nov. 18, is the result of a survey of 215 kilometers of cycle paths across the city, conducted by volunteer urban cyclists for seven weeks in fall 2021.

This survey by the Toronto Community Bikeways Coalition found that more than half of Toronto’s cycling facilities were rated below average. These facilities included cycle lanes, cycle paths, and sidewalk-level cycle lanes, and the 77 report cards from 23 surveyors ranked them based on safety, quality, ability to connect with each other, and of their general utility.

The bulletins classified the routes into four categories: poor, poor, good and very good.

Based on the categories, 17 reviews of 41.65 kilometers were rated as poor, 30 reviews of 74.12 kilometers were rated as poor, 12 reviews of 40 kilometers of infrastructure were rated as good, and 11 reviews of 51 kilometers (including including the 22 kilometer waterfront road) have been rated. very good.

Based on these measurements, 56% of cycling infrastructure was rated from poor to poor – which the report’s authors identified as a failure rating.

The worst lanes were in every part of town: Bay Street and Davenport Road in downtown, St. Dennis Drive in Flemingdon Park, Finch Avenue West in North York, Steeles Avenue East in Scarborough and the roads on Royal York Road and Renforth Drive in Etobicoke.

At the top of the class, on the other hand, was a pilot project bike path on Yonge Street from Bloor Street to Davisville Road, and lanes on Shuter Street and Crescent Town Road.

These, according to the statement, have performed well for consistent markings on the roadway and continuous safety barriers and for connecting workplaces, schools and public transport stations.

The group did not assess recreational trails beyond the waterfront road, as off-road trails were deemed unsuitable for utility travel, having relatively few access points. They also ignored construction projects interfering with cycling infrastructure, as this was seen as a temporary problem.

The group calls for a further expansion of the network as well as repair work on the existing infrastructure.

“The number of cycle paths that do not meet a modern standard of quality or utility is significant and requires special attention from the town hall,” the report said. “This upgrade must not come at the expense of new essential cycling facilities. “


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Shell promotes sustainable urban solutions https://companyofcyclists.com/shell-promotes-sustainable-urban-solutions/ https://companyofcyclists.com/shell-promotes-sustainable-urban-solutions/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 14:21:05 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/shell-promotes-sustainable-urban-solutions/ As the economy slowly recovers from the adverse effects of the pandemic, the country needs efficient and active multimodal transport systems that will help businesses and communities operate efficiently and sustainably, industry leaders said. . During the Future Festival, a four-part series launched by Pilipinas Shell Petroleum Corp. (PSPC) which tackles the pillars essential to […]]]>


As the economy slowly recovers from the adverse effects of the pandemic, the country needs efficient and active multimodal transport systems that will help businesses and communities operate efficiently and sustainably, industry leaders said. .

During the Future Festival, a four-part series launched by Pilipinas Shell Petroleum Corp. (PSPC) which tackles the pillars essential to the nation’s progress, transport sector leaders highlighted mobility challenges such as insufficient access to public transport, weak infrastructure and outdated policies. To address this, they looked at urban planning, sustainability and innovative solutions based on efficiency, public safety, thoughtful planning and collaboration.

Speaking at the online forum, Randy del Valle, vice president and general manager of mobility for PSPC, said: “Mobility is not just about transportation. whether it’s traffic, urbanization, the need for safer roads and public transport, or the long-term effects of the pandemic – we need many solutions, not just one. ” Deputy Transport Secretary Mark Steven Pastor, an advocate for active transport, said his organization was seeking to expand the country’s pre-existing 500 kilometers of “cycle lane networks in metropolitan cities with the aim of increasing accessibility to areas of ‘key activity and fundamental facilities, significantly reducing carbon as well as promoting road safety. “He said the Ministry of Transport is also exploring improving the mobility of conventional vehicles through dedicated lanes for The public utility vehicle movement project, said Pastor, is a “large-scale transformational initiative of this administration that is structured, modern, well managed and environmentally sustainable. Drivers have a stable, sufficient and dignified livelihood while commuters get to their destinations safely. and comfortably. ”Additionally, as travel slowly picks up, National Capital Region (NCR) Department of Tourism Director Woodrow Maquiling Jr. said“ greenways have been put in place ”. With the support of the national government and more flexible health protocols, these will allow the entry of fully vaccinated people into the country for business or leisure. Maquiling added that this initiative will lead to “boosting commercial activity and to provide employment opportunities while ensuring security against the spread of Covid-19, “he said.

Cycling” towns

Beyond the locality, Kevin Punzalan, Senior Policy Officer of the Netherlands Embassy in the Philippines, shared his ideas based on the strategies and best practices of the Dutch who have pioneered some of the most “cities” cyclables ”in the world.

“Cycling cities are better designed for people, make transportation accessible and affordable, and create a healthier and safer city,” Punzalan said, noting that more funding and government policies are needed to ensure safety and mobility. efficient cyclists and pedestrians.

Keisha Mayuga, Head of the Safe Walking and Cycling Transportation Program at Move As One, said, “The top three barriers preventing people from taking active transportation are the lack of cycle paths, bicycle parking and bicycle parking. of facilities after the trip to their destinations ”. For his part, Felino “Jun” Palafox Jr., principal architect and founder of Palafox Associates, stressed that the country’s urban planning initiatives in terms of mobility “are a hundred years behind.” Safety is also a vital factor which mobility must be taken into account, he noted.

“Town planning [in the country] is always looking for supply and demand for traffic, ”Palafox added. “EDSA works like eight roads: main artery, minor artery, access roads, and so on. This is why the traffic [is congested]On a related note, Bill Luz, president of Liveable Cities Challenge Philippines, cited the lack of urban planning experts who can help cities and municipalities establish their own sustainable systems and improve road safety in the city. local communities.


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Action on climate change will improve health and save lives now and in the future | Imperial News https://companyofcyclists.com/action-on-climate-change-will-improve-health-and-save-lives-now-and-in-the-future-imperial-news/ https://companyofcyclists.com/action-on-climate-change-will-improve-health-and-save-lives-now-and-in-the-future-imperial-news/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 23:26:15 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/action-on-climate-change-will-improve-health-and-save-lives-now-and-in-the-future-imperial-news/ Measures to combat climate change could greatly benefit human health in the coming years, as well as in the long term, according to a new report. Released today, the Academy of Medical Sciences and Royal Society report calls on the UK government to ensure that the initiatives they put in place to tackle climate change […]]]>






Measures to combat climate change could greatly benefit human health in the coming years, as well as in the long term, according to a new report.

Released today, the Academy of Medical Sciences and Royal Society report calls on the UK government to ensure that the initiatives they put in place to tackle climate change are also designed to deliver benefits for health.

The report brought together 11 leading experts, including Professor Emeritus Jo Haigh and Professor Frank Kelly of Imperial College London, to examine evidence from various sources regarding the health impacts of anti-change initiatives. climate.

We would like the UK government to seize the opportunity offered by COP26 to show global leadership and put health at the forefront of the climate discourse. Professor Joanna Haigh

It concludes that if health is placed at the heart of the climate agenda, measures taken to achieve net greenhouse gas emissions in the UK by 2050 will have short-term human health benefits in the UK. -United, while helping to reduce health risks. global climate change.

Report Co-Chair Professor Joanna Haigh, Grantham Institute – Climate Change and the Environment at Imperial, said: “Climate change poses a catastrophic threat to humanity and the natural systems that underpin our lives.

“It is clear that tackling climate change will have a positive impact on human health in the long term, but our report provides evidence that many of the actions needed in the UK to achieve the goal of net zero gas emissions greenhouse effect by 2050 will also benefit our health in the short term.

“We would like the UK government to seize the opportunity offered by COP26 to show global leadership and put health at the forefront of the climate discourse. “

Health at the heart of discussions on climate change

The report urges UK policymakers and donors to put health benefits at the heart of discussions, debates and actions on climate change. Here are key examples of areas where action on climate change has a positive impact on health:

  • Phasing out fossil fuels: The shift from fossil fuels to cleaner electricity generation will reduce air pollution, improve health and save lives. Air pollution causes between 28,000 and 36,000 premature deaths a year in the UK, many of which could be avoided by phasing out fossil fuels. The extent of the health benefits of the net zero transition will depend on the energy mix. For example, the substantial use of biomass to replace fossil fuels will reduce the expected health benefits from increased air pollution from fine particle emissions.
  • To travel: Domestic transport, mainly from road vehicles, is responsible for 27% of UK greenhouse gas emissions. Electric cars charging in a streetSupport for public transport, increased cycling and walking, as well as a shift to electric vehicles, will lead to environmental and health benefits through increased physical activity and reduced air pollution. The daily increase in walking and cycling in cities in England and Wales – similar to Copenhagen levels – could reduce heart disease, stroke, diabetes and other illnesses with potential savings for the NHS by £ 17 billion over 20 years.
  • Food production and feeding: Food production accounts for 23% of UK greenhouse gas emissions. Continuing to reduce the consumption of red meat in the UK while increasing the consumption of fruits and vegetables would significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions and prevent or delay deaths from heart disease, stroke and cancer. A healthy diet containing less red and processed meats and more fruits and vegetables is expected to increase average life expectancy by about eight months and reduce diet-related greenhouse gas emissions by about 17%.
  • Buildings: In 2019, buildings were responsible for 17% of UK greenhouse gas emissions. Low temperatures are linked to up to 50,000 deaths per year – warmer, better insulated homes should therefore prevent some of these premature deaths, as well as lower fuel bills. Adequate ventilation is also necessary to ensure indoor air quality and maximize health benefits.
  • Health care: Health systems around the world are responsible for 4 to 5% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Last year, the NHS was the first national health system to commit to reducing net direct emissions by 2040 and indirect emissions by 2045.

“Win-win” actions

The report noted that while the impact of climate change mitigation strategies was primarily positive, there could also be unintended negative health effects.

Special attention needs to be paid to the international supply chains and economic systems that will underpin the global net-zero transition – for example, reliance on batteries for renewable energy means that more must be extracted. cobalt, which can have negative effects on the health of the communities concerned.

A vegan meal seen aboveThe report also calls for climate change initiatives to be rigorously and systematically monitored for their health impacts, and for researchers from different disciplines to work together to help maximize health benefits.

Report Co-Chair Professor Sir Andy Haines said: “Our report provides many ‘win-win’ examples of actions that would have a positive impact on health and the climate. Sectors such as transport, food, construction and energy should consider health when implementing climate actions to capitalize on these double benefits.

“Many measures, such as improving access to public transport and energy-efficient housing, could also help reduce health inequalities. “

Read the full report, “A Healthy Future: Tackling Climate Change Mitigation and Human Health Together” and a public summary of the findings on the Academy of Medical Sciences website.

Article based on a press release from the Academy of Medical Sciences.

Image credits:

Cycling: Lena Ivanova / Shutterstock

Electric cars: Scharfsinn / Shutterstock

Vegan meal: Photographee.eu / Shutterstock


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45 million healthcare professionals call for action on the climate crisis https://companyofcyclists.com/45-million-healthcare-professionals-call-for-action-on-the-climate-crisis/ https://companyofcyclists.com/45-million-healthcare-professionals-call-for-action-on-the-climate-crisis/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 02:03:45 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/45-million-healthcare-professionals-call-for-action-on-the-climate-crisis/ More than 450 organizations representing more than 45 million health workers have signed an open letter calling on world leaders to step up climate action. The letter was released on Monday in collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO) Special report on climate change and health, which proposes a set of priority recommendations on which […]]]>


More than 450 organizations representing more than 45 million health workers have signed an open letter calling on world leaders to step up climate action. The letter was released on Monday in collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO) Special report on climate change and health, which proposes a set of priority recommendations on which countries must act to face the current climate and health crises.

The report and letter aim to persuade leaders to commit to reaching ambitious climate goals at the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference (also known as COP26) to be held in Glasgow, Scotland, from October 31 to November 12.

“Everywhere we provide care, in our hospitals, clinics and communities around the world, we are already responding to the damage to health caused by climate change,” reads the letter from healthcare professionals. “We call on the leaders of each country and their representatives at COP26 to avoid the impending health catastrophe by limiting global warming to 1.5 ° C (2.7 ° Fahrenheit) and to put human health and equity at the heart. of all actions to mitigate and adapt to climate change. “According to Yale Climate Connections, 2.7 degrees F is the maximum amount that global average temperatures can rise before the planet experiences truly catastrophic effects.

Mary Prunicki, MD, PhD, director of air pollution and health research at the Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy & Asthma Research at Stanford University in California, points out that climate change likely has an impact on health more than any other cause.

“The higher the temperatures, the worse it will be,” she said.

Even slight increases of a few degrees can be harmful to human health, according to Dr. Prunicki. As the planet warms, she says more and more seniors are suffering from cardiovascular and respiratory problems, and cases of childhood asthma are on the rise.

These urgent calls to action from WHO and health professionals come as unprecedented extreme weather events and other climate impacts wreak havoc on people’s lives and health. Statistics presented by the Thomson Reuters Foundation show that air pollution kills 800 people per hour or 13 per minute, more than three times the number of people who die each year from malaria, tuberculosis and AIDS combined.

In a statement, the WHO said: “Increasingly frequent extreme weather events, such as heat waves, storms and floods, are killing thousands and disrupting millions of lives, while threatening human beings. health systems and facilities when they are needed most. Weather and climate change threatens food security and increases food, water and vector borne diseases, such as malaria, while climate impacts also negatively affect mental health. “

The COP26 report highlights 10 priorities to preserve the health of people and the planet:

  • Get involved in healthy, green and fair recovery from COVID-19.
  • Our health is not negotiable. Place health and social justice at the heart of UN climate talks.
  • Harnessing the health benefits of climate action. Prioritize climate interventions with the greatest health, social and economic gains.
  • Strengthen health resilience in the face of climate risks. Build climate resilient and environmentally friendly health systems and facilities, and support health adaptation and resilience across sectors.
  • Create energy systems that protect and improve climate and health. Guide a just and inclusive transition to renewable energies to save lives from air pollution, especially from coal combustion. End energy poverty in households and health establishments.
  • Reinvent urban environments, transport and mobility. Promote sustainable and healthy urban design and transport systems, with better land use, access to green and blue public spaces, and priority to walking, cycling and public transport.
  • Protect and restore nature as the foundation of our health. Protect and restore natural systems, the foundations for healthy living, sustainable food systems and livelihoods.
  • Promote healthy, sustainable and resilient food systems. Promote sustainable and resilient food production and more affordable and nutritious diets that produce both climate and health outcomes.
  • Fund a healthier, fairer and greener future to save lives. Transition to a welfare economy.
  • Listen to the health community and prescribe urgent climate action. Mobilize and support the health community on climate action.

In a similar effort last month, more than 200 leading medical journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), the Lancet, and the British Medical Journal (BMJ) – came together to launch an urgent call for action to fight climate change.

“It has never been clearer that the climate crisis is one of the most pressing health emergencies we all face,” said Dr María Neira, Director of Environment, Climate Change and Health WHO, in a press release. “Reducing air pollution to WHO guideline levels, for example, would reduce the total number of air pollution deaths globally by 80% while dramatically reducing the greenhouse gas emissions that fuel change. climate. A shift to more nutritious, plant-based diets in line with WHO recommendations, as another example, could dramatically reduce global emissions, ensure more resilient food systems and prevent up to 5.1 million related deaths. to food per year by 2050. “


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