public health – Company Of Cyclists http://companyofcyclists.com/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 03:12:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://companyofcyclists.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7-120x120.png public health – Company Of Cyclists http://companyofcyclists.com/ 32 32 A U.S. bankruptcy judge has approved Purdue Pharma and Sacklers’ $6 billion settlement agreement with the states, according to Connecticut AG https://companyofcyclists.com/a-u-s-bankruptcy-judge-has-approved-purdue-pharma-and-sacklers-6-billion-settlement-agreement-with-the-states-according-to-connecticut-ag/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 03:12:00 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/a-u-s-bankruptcy-judge-has-approved-purdue-pharma-and-sacklers-6-billion-settlement-agreement-with-the-states-according-to-connecticut-ag/ The new agreement, reached earlier this month after eight states and the District of Columbia finally appealed a previous agreement, does not protect the Sackler families from future liability related to the opioid crisis. “No settlement will ever come close to remedying the magnitude of the suffering and damage caused by Purdue and the Sackler […]]]>
The new agreement, reached earlier this month after eight states and the District of Columbia finally appealed a previous agreement, does not protect the Sackler families from future liability related to the opioid crisis.

“No settlement will ever come close to remedying the magnitude of the suffering and damage caused by Purdue and the Sackler family,” Tong said in a statement. “But in reaching this $6 billion settlement, we recognized that we could not block this process forever for the victims and our sister states.”

Tong added that there will be a hearing on Thursday which will give “victims and survivors the opportunity to speak directly to the Sacklers and share in the damage and destruction they have caused.”

“We are not done fighting for justice against the addiction industry,” Tong said.

As part of the agreement, the Sackler families will authorize any institution or organization in the country to remove the Sackler name from physical facilities and academic, medical and cultural programs, scholarships and endowments as long as the Sacklers are notified first and that public statements announcing the estrangement’s name do not “disparage” the family.

In a pre-drafted statement, the Sackler families said they were “pleased to have reached a settlement with additional states that will allow very substantial additional resources to reach people and communities in need.”

“The families have consistently maintained that the settlement is by far the best way to help resolve a serious and complex public health crisis. Although the families acted lawfully in all respects, they sincerely regret that OxyContin, a drug on prescription that continues to help people with chronic pain, has unexpectedly become part of an opioid crisis that has caused heartbreak and loss to far too many families and communities, he said. added.

In a statement to CNN last week, Purdue Pharma also said it was happy with the settlement.
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Current Trends, Upcoming Demand, CAGR Status – ZNews Africa https://companyofcyclists.com/current-trends-upcoming-demand-cagr-status-znews-africa/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 00:22:35 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/current-trends-upcoming-demand-cagr-status-znews-africa/ GET A SAMPLE REPORTBUY THE FULL REPORT Global bicycle wheels market research is an intelligence report with meticulous efforts undertaken to study the correct and valuable information. The data that has been reviewed takes into account both existing top players and upcoming competitors. The business strategies of key players and new industries entering the market […]]]>

Global bicycle wheels market research is an intelligence report with meticulous efforts undertaken to study the correct and valuable information. The data that has been reviewed takes into account both existing top players and upcoming competitors. The business strategies of key players and new industries entering the market are studied in detail. A well-explained SWOT analysis, revenue share and contact information are shared in this report analysis. It also provides market information in terms of development and its capabilities.

Global “Bike Wheels Market” Research Report 2022-2028 is a factual overview and in-depth study on the current and future market of the Mobility Health Solutions industry. The Bicycle Wheels market report provides supreme data, such as development strategy, competitive landscape, environment, opportunities, risks, challenges and barriers, value chain optimization, contact and income information, technological advancements, product offerings of key players and dynamic structure. of the market. The Bicycle Wheels market report provides growth rate, recent trends, and an absolute study of key players at regular intervals in the market based on the weightlessness of their product description, business outline, and their business tactics.

Download a free PDF sample report with full TOC, figures and graphs (with covid 19 impact analysis): https://www.maccuracyreports.com/report-sample/493998

According to MRA, the global Bicycle Wheels market is expected to reach xxx Million USD in 2022 and is projected to grow at a CAGR of xx% during the period 2022-2028. The report analyzes the global Bicycle Wheels market, market size and growth, and major market players.

The analysis includes market size, upstream situation, market segmentation, market segmentation, price and cost and industry environment. In addition, the report outlines the factors driving industry growth and description of market channels. The report begins with an overview of the structure of the industry chain and describes the upstream. Additionally, the report analyzes the market size and forecast across different geographies, types, and end-use segments. Additionally, the report presents an overview of market competition among leading companies and company profiles. Also, market price and channel features are covered in the report.

Key regions

Asia Pacific

North America

Europe

South America

Middle East and Africa

Key companies

Shimano

Campagnolo

Zipper

Knight Composites

DT Switzerland

Main components

Mavic

FFWD wheels

ProLite

Miche

Industry New

Forza Cirrus

Rolf Prima

Sensa Supra

Halo Wheels

hunting bike wheels

Yishun Bike

Ambrosius

Williams bike

ROL wheels

Easton Cycling

Cero wheels

Boyd Cycling

Woven

Key product type

Alloy Wheels

Carbon wheels

Others

Market by Application

Road bike

Mountain bike

Gravel/Cyclo-cross bike

track bike

Others

Main aspects covered in the report

Overview of Bicycle Wheels Market including production, consumption, status and forecast and market growth

Historical data 2017-2022 and market forecast 2022-2028

Geographical analysis including major countries

Product type market overview including development

Overview of end-user market including development

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Impact of COVID-19

The report covers the impact of the COVID-19 coronavirus: Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 virus in December 2019, the disease has spread to almost every country in the world, as declared by the World Health Organization public health emergency. The global impacts of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are already starting to be felt and will significantly affect the bicycle wheels market in 2022.

The COVID-19 outbreak has affected many aspects, such as flight cancellations; travel bans and quarantines; restaurants closed; all restricted indoor/outdoor events; more than forty countries declare a state of emergency; massive supply chain slowdown; stock market volatility; declining business confidence, growing panic among the population and uncertainty about the future.

Highlights of the Bicycle Wheels Market Report Coverage:

– A comprehensive background analysis, which includes an assessment of the global Bicycle Wheels market.
– Significant changes in market dynamics of Bicycle Wheels Market
– Segmentation of the bicycle wheels market up to the second and third level regional bifurcation
– Historical, current, and projected market size of the Bicycle Wheels market in terms of value (revenue) and volume (production and consumption)
– Report and assessment of recent developments in the Bicycle Wheels market
– Market shares of the bicycle wheels market and strategies of the main players
– Emerging niche market segments for bicycle wheels and regional markets
– An objective assessment of the trajectory of the Bicycle Wheels market
– Recommendations for the companies to strengthen their market presence in the Bicycle Wheels market

Additionally, the export and import policies that can have an immediate impact on the global bicycle wheels market. This study contains an EXIM* related chapter on the Global Bicycle Wheels Market and all its associated companies with their profiles, which provides valuable data regarding their prospects in terms of finances, product portfolios, investment plans and marketing and sales strategies.

Comprehensive report on the Bicycle Wheels market report spread over 200+ pages, list of tables and figures, profiling 10+ companies. Select license version and purchase this updated research report directly @ https://www.maccuracyreports.com/checkout/493998

Answers to key questions in the report:

• What is the growth potential of the bicycle wheels market?
• Which product segment will take the lion’s share?
• Which regional market will impose itself as a pioneer in the years to come?
• Which application segment will experience strong growth?
• What growth opportunities might arise in the mobility healthcare solutions industry in the coming years?
• What are the most important challenges that the bicycle wheel market could face in the future?
• Who are the major companies in the bicycle wheel market?
• What are the main trends that are positively impacting market growth?
• What growth strategies are the players considering to stay in the bicycle wheels market?

If you have any special requirements, please let us know and we will offer the report as you wish.

About Us:

MR Accuracy Reports’ well-researched contributions that encompass areas ranging from IT to healthcare enable our valued clients to capitalize on key growth opportunities and protect against credible threats prevailing in the market in the scenario current and those expected in the near future. Our research reports provide our clients with macro-level insights in various key regions of the world that provide them with a broader perspective to align their strategies to take advantage of lucrative growth opportunities in the market.

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The scientific case for abolishing fast food drive-thru has nothing to do with obesity https://companyofcyclists.com/the-scientific-case-for-abolishing-fast-food-drive-thru-has-nothing-to-do-with-obesity/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 08:00:25 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/the-scientific-case-for-abolishing-fast-food-drive-thru-has-nothing-to-do-with-obesity/ Drive-in – services that allow people to order and collect food and drink without having to leave their car – are designed with convenience in mind. Whether it’s blisteringly hot, uncomfortable cold, or we’re just in a hurry, drive-thru has become very appealing in an age characterized by a desire to immediacy. In the UK, […]]]>

Drive-in – services that allow people to order and collect food and drink without having to leave their car – are designed with convenience in mind. Whether it’s blisteringly hot, uncomfortable cold, or we’re just in a hurry, drive-thru has become very appealing in an age characterized by a desire to immediacy.

In the UK, where there are approximately 2,000 passes at the wheelit is not uncommon to see queues of vehicles meandering with drivers waiting their turn to pass, pay and collect their orders.

In fact, drive-thru is on an upward trajectory in the UK. 41 percent increase the number of drive-ins between 2015 and 2020, and 12% of sales in fast food restaurants and coffee chains were made through their drive-thru sites in the year to March 2021: 50% more than pre-Covid figures.

This service has become essential for many. Drive-thru services offer benefits to people with limited mobility as well as those with very busy schedules or people who argue with young children. In the United States, even some banks and pharmacies offer drive-thru options. And by helping customers avoid eating indoors, drive-thrus may also have helped limit the spread of Covid-19. But drive-ins come at a cost.

First, drive-thrus require excessive idling, which is banned on public roads in the UK, but regularly and casually in queues at the wheel. In addition to increasing emissions, waste fuel and damaging enginestailpipe emissions associated with idling create local air pollution with serious environmental and health consequences.

Poor air quality is already a widespread problem in the UK, where more than two-thirds of local authorities infringe air quality objectives. Even if we were to achieve these goals, the Royal College of Physicians warned that only a fraction of incidences of air quality-related illnesses – including lung cancer, asthma attacks and overall reduced life expectancy – would be avoided. Currently, air pollution causes 40,000 dead per year in the UK, with annual costs to the NHS of over £20 billion ($27.2 billion).

In light of the current situation transition towards electric vehicles, environmental concerns related to idling will decrease. The UK project to phase out sales of internal combustion engines will also reduce tailpipe emissions as we head towards 2050.

Yet even so, emissions from brake wear and tire wear are respectively responsible for 16 to 55 percent and five to 30 percent non-tailpipe emissions in UK cities. This means that air pollution and its health effects will not be completely solved by switching to electric cars.

Drive-through: the end result

Cities around the world have started cracking down on drive-thrus, despite renewed investment following the pandemic.

Some regions of Canada and the United States have already banned or restricted new drive-ins, while cities like Glasgow are beginning to consider following suit. As the UK attempts to reduce the number of car owners and use, drive-ins will also inevitably be discouraged.

Curbing the expansion of drive-thru will not seriously affect UK restaurant revenues: especially given their relatively small market share considering that 70 percent of fast food sales in the United States are made through drive-thru. However, the negative implications of the “drive-thru culture” have deeper roots.

Car-centric transport planning has dominated urban development in the UK since the World War II. It has increased congestion and contributed to public health issues such as the effects of poor air quality and increasing incidence of obesity by cutting the share of journeys via more environmentally friendly options such as public transport, cyclingand while walking.

In many countries, the huge space reserved for cars could be used to improve health and well-being.Antonio Silveira/Flickr

Urban development that prioritises cars is also incompatible with the UK government’s aims to improve well-being, food systemsand public health. Instead, build cities with wider sidewalks, separate bike lanes, and widespread public transport – where we can reduce our addiction about cars and fast food – represents the healthy urban future that experts suggest that we should try to create.

And for those with mobility or childcare issues, the growth of smartphone apps enabling delivery from restaurant to car outside the drive-thru makes it easy and safe for people to pick up food without having to wait in line. Food delivery apps whose cyclists use bikes can also help reduce car trips while maintaining convenience.

As a society, we need to reflect on the profoundly negative effects of living in a society that has become so time pressed that we cannot afford to get out of our cars to get food, let alone to Eat it.

Fundamentally, drive-ins are symptomatic of a way of life we ​​need to move away from – for the good of our planet. Limiting them to the UK would be a sign of progress not only for the environment but also for our society.

This article was originally published on The conversation by Eugene Mohareb at the University of Reading and Sybil Derrible at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Read it original article here.

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20 minutes of daily exercise at age 70 can prevent major heart disease later https://companyofcyclists.com/20-minutes-of-daily-exercise-at-age-70-can-prevent-major-heart-disease-later/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 04:03:00 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/20-minutes-of-daily-exercise-at-age-70-can-prevent-major-heart-disease-later/ Exercising at an older age is always recommended so that older people can avoid getting diseases due to lack of physical movement. Now, research has suggested that twenty minutes of moderate to vigorous daily exercise in early old age (seventy to seventy-five) may better prevent major heart disease, including heart failure, in later life. old […]]]>

Exercising at an older age is always recommended so that older people can avoid getting diseases due to lack of physical movement. Now, research has suggested that twenty minutes of moderate to vigorous daily exercise in early old age (seventy to seventy-five) may better prevent major heart disease, including heart failure, in later life. old age (over eighty).

The research was published online in the journal “Heart.” The results reinforced the ‘better late than never’ maxim when it comes to exercise, but earlier in old age is better, a linked editorial concluded.

It’s no secret that physical activity is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and a longer life, regardless of gender and ethnicity, with the benefits accruing in tandem with effort expended.

But relatively few studies have looked exclusively at whether exercise later in life can help prevent heart disease and stroke in older adults.

To fill this knowledge gap, the researchers relied on data from Progetto Veneto Anziani (ProVA), a study of 3,099 elderly Italians (65 years and older).

Initial evaluations, including a detailed medical history, physical examination, scans and a battery of blood tests were carried out between 1995 and 1997, with two further evaluations four and seven years later.

At the start of the study, women were more likely than men to have more than four coexisting conditions, with a higher prevalence of osteoarthritis, osteoporosis and chronic kidney disease; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and diabetes were more common in men.

Participants completed questionnaires about their level of physical activity at each time point. Moderate physical activity included walking, bowling, and fishing, while vigorous physical activity included gardening, gym workouts, cycling, dancing, and swimming.

Those whose physical activity amounted to twenty minutes or more per day were defined as active; those who recorded less than that were defined as inactive. Men were more likely to be physically active than women.

Changes in physical activity patterns were defined as: stable-low (inactive-inactive); up-down (on-off); low-rise (inactive-active); and stable-high (active-active).

Other potentially important background information on household income, level of education, number of household members, smoking and alcohol was also collected.

The health of all participants was then tracked through a link to hospital discharge records and death certificate until the end of December 2018. The final analysis included 2754 participants with complete data, including 1398 were women (60%).

During the monitoring period, 1037 new diagnoses of heart disease, heart failure and stroke were made.

Increasing levels of physical activity as well as maintaining an active lifestyle over time were associated with lower risks of cardiovascular disease and death in both men and women.

The greatest risk reduction was observed for new cases of coronary heart disease and heart failure in old age. No significant association between physical activity and stroke was observed.

Most participants had stable active physical activity patterns over time. Steady-high physical activity patterns were associated with a significantly (52%) lower risk of cardiovascular disease in men compared to those with steady-low patterns.

The greatest benefits seemed to occur at the age of seventy. The risk was only slightly lower at age seventy-five, and not lower at age eighty-eight, suggesting that improving physical activity earlier in old age could have the most impact, the researchers said.

A J-shaped curve for exercise duration was also observed, with the greatest reduction in heart disease and heart failure associated with twenty to forty minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity each day. .

While the observed associations were strongest in men, the researchers pointed out that “women doing more physical activity had consistently lower incidence rates for almost all cardiovascular outcomes despite the fact that reduced risk did not reach statistical significance, but when considering overall mortality, the risks were reduced significantly.”

This was an observational study, and as such cannot establish causation. The researchers acknowledged that the study relied on participant recall, that physical activity levels were assessed subjectively, and that no data were available on midlife physical activity levels, which would have all could influence end-of-life cardiovascular risk profiles.

Nevertheless, they concluded, “These findings suggest that public health policies should aim to promote or initiate physical activity in mid and early late life, given likely greater efficacy in reducing cardiovascular risks.

“At least twenty minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity daily should be recommended for greatest cardiovascular benefits.”

In a linked editorial, Drs Enrico Fabris and Gianfranco Sinagra of the University of Trieste, Italy, explained that physical activity helps improve arterial blood flow and can reduce its adherence and therefore the formation of blood clots.

“However, the detailed mechanisms by which [physical activity] can reduce the future risk of [cardiovascular disease] are still not fully understood, they pointed out.

“The favorable effect of [physical activity] can be explained simply by its ability to slow down the process of atherosclerosis through better control of blood pressure, blood sugar and lipid profile.”

But the results showed that “movement is medicine” also at the end of life. Even a small amount of [physical activity] may confer beneficial effects in the elderly, but if undertaken sooner rather than later,” they concluded. (ANI)

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Online Fitness Training vs. In-Person Workouts: Which Is Better? news https://companyofcyclists.com/online-fitness-training-vs-in-person-workouts-which-is-better-news/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 12:21:58 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/online-fitness-training-vs-in-person-workouts-which-is-better-news/ When the coronavirus pandemic temporarily closed gyms across the country in 2020, many people chose to do their workouts at home through online instructions. Even after the fitness facilities reopened, many people chose to stay home. This is probably why online training landed first in the Worldwide Survey of Fitness Trends for 2021, a survey […]]]>

When the coronavirus pandemic temporarily closed gyms across the country in 2020, many people chose to do their workouts at home through online instructions. Even after the fitness facilities reopened, many people chose to stay home. This is probably why online training landed first in the Worldwide Survey of Fitness Trends for 2021, a survey conducted annually by the American College of Sports Medicine. Online training involves the use of digital streaming technology to deliver exercise programs for groups or individuals, and encompasses both live streamed and pre-recorded workouts. Today, with the omicron variant roaming the world and many gym goers considering a return to online education, this trend appears to be here to stay. Or at least a version of it. “I predict that a hybrid model will be the trend of the future,” said Jennifer Rewkowski, vice president of community health and wellness at the YMCA of Metro Atlanta, which offers in-person and online workouts. . “The world has changed so much in the last 19 months when it comes to people’s hours and places of work, education, etc. For some people, the on-demand world really works, she said. by email. But one training format is better than the other. ? Experts say it depends. Here are several factors to consider when deciding to hit the gym or your living room for your next workout. Important Note: Before starting any new exercise program, consult your physician. Stop immediately if you experience pain. Also, be sure to check out the COVIID-19 tips in your area. Online training is more accessible and cheaper. No need to get out of bed at 5 a.m. to take this 6 a.m. boot camp course, which can end up being full when you arrive. Instead, you can turn it on at home at your convenience. What if you’re on the road? No problem. You can access your workout via your phone, tablet or laptop. Another advantage is the price. Gym memberships can be expensive, while online workouts are less expensive – and sometimes even free. The Irving Park YMCA in Chicago, for example, charges $ 52 per month for an adult membership (27 and over), plus a membership fee of $ 52. The online Les Mills + program, on the other hand, offers a 30-day free trial of its more than 1,500 workouts. If you like them, it only costs $ 9.99 per month when you sign up for a year. There is, however, a problem with the price. Some online workouts require specific equipment, such as stability balls or weights, which you may need to purchase. And if you fall in love with the popular Peloton home workout and just need to have one of its specialty bikes, be prepared to shell out between $ 1,500 and $ 2,500. In-Person Workouts Are Usually Safer One of the main disadvantages of online workouts is that there is no experienced instructor to give you feedback. “When you’re in a structured, supervised environment, someone who knows what they’re doing can help,” said John Quindry, president of the School of Integrative Physiology and Athletic Training at the University of Montana. . “If your form is poor, or if you are going too hard or not hard enough, these problems can be corrected when supervised. , you could really be in trouble. That being said, face-to-face classes aren’t perfect when it comes to security. Instructors may not notice someone’s poor form if a class is crowded or someone intentionally stepped in the back out of embarrassment, Quindry said. It doesn’t matter whether you choose a fitness center or an online option, make sure the instructors are qualified, especially if you have a medical condition of concern. Anyone can post an exercise video online, and some fitness centers hire instructors with minimal qualifications. In-person workouts can keep you more responsible. you don’t want to. You won’t want to disappoint them, after all. But no one will know if you don’t activate an online workout. You might be more motivated by the variety of online workout options. Your in-person training options are highly dependent on the facility. Smaller fitness centers may only offer a handful of classes, such as yoga, cycling, and kickboxing. Other institutions may have a wide variety of courses available, but they charge additional fees. Online options, on the other hand, usually offer a huge assortment of courses. And this buffet of options may be just what you need to avoid boredom and stay motivated to sweat regularly. said Jafra Thomas, assistant professor in the department of kinesiology and public health at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. He said. “While appreciation of movement is rarely encouraged by platform builders or instructors, physical activity offers many health benefits.”

When the coronavirus pandemic temporarily closed gyms across the country in 2020, many people chose to do their workouts at home through online instructions. Even after the fitness facilities reopened, many people chose to stay home. This is probably why online training has taken the top spot in the Global Fitness Trends Survey for 2021, a survey conducted annually by the American College of Sports Medicine.

Online training involves the use of digital streaming technology to deliver exercise programs for groups or individuals, and encompasses both live streamed and pre-recorded workouts. Today, with the omicron variant roaming the world and many gym goers considering a return to online education, this trend appears to be here to stay. Or at least a version of it.

“I predict that a hybrid model will be the trend of the future,” said Jennifer Rewkowski, vice president of community health and wellness at the YMCA of Metro Atlanta, which offers in-person workouts and in line. “The world has changed so much in the last 19 months when it comes to people’s hours and places of work, education, etc. For some people, the on-demand world really works,” she said. by email.

But is one training format better than another? Experts say it depends. Here are several factors to consider when deciding whether you want to hit the gym or your living room for your next workout.

Important note: Before starting any new exercise program, consult your doctor. Stop immediately if you experience pain. Also, be sure to check the COVIID-19 guidelines in your area.

Online workouts are more accessible and cheaper

One of the most popular reasons for working on an online video is that it provides ultimate convenience. No need to get out of bed at 5 a.m. to take this 6 a.m. boot camp course, which can end up being full when you arrive. Instead, you can turn it on at home at your convenience. What if you’re on the road? No problem. You can access your workout via your phone, tablet or laptop.

Another advantage is the price. Gym memberships can be expensive, while online workouts are less expensive – and sometimes even free. that of Chicago YMCA of Irving Park, for example, charges $ 52 per month for an adult membership (27 and over), plus a membership fee of $ 52. The online The Mills + program, on the other hand, offers a 30-day free trial of its more than 1,500 workouts. If you like them, it’s only $ 9.99 per month when you sign up for a year.

There is a catch when it comes to the price though. Some online workouts require specific equipment, such as stability balls or weights, which you may need to purchase. And if you fall in love with the popular Peloton home workout and just need to have one of its specialty bikes, be prepared to shell out between $ 1,500 and $ 2,500.

In-person workouts are generally safer

One of the main disadvantages of online workouts is that there is no experienced instructor to give you feedback. “When you’re in a structured, supervised environment, someone who knows what they’re doing can help,” said John Quindry, president of the School of Integrative Physiology and Athletic Training at the University of Montana. . “If your form is wrong, or if you go too hard or not hard enough, these problems can be fixed under supervision. “

Plus, if you exercise at home alone and fall, or have a heart or metabolic problem, you could really be in trouble. That being said, face-to-face classes aren’t perfect when it comes to security. Instructors may not notice someone’s poor form if a class is crowded or someone intentionally stepped in the back out of embarrassment, Quindry said.

Whether you choose a fitness center or an online option, make sure the instructors are qualified, especially if you have a health concern of concern. Anyone can post an exercise video online, and some fitness centers hire instructors with minimal qualifications.

In-person workouts can hold you more accountable

If you take a yoga or barre class with your best friend every Tuesday, you might go even on days you don’t feel like it. You won’t want to disappoint them, after all. But no one will know if you don’t activate an online workout.

You may be more motivated by the variety of online workout options

Your in-person training options are highly dependent on the facility. Smaller fitness centers may only offer a handful of classes, such as yoga, cycling, and kickboxing. Other institutions may have a wide variety of courses available, but they charge additional fees. Online options, on the other hand, usually offer a huge assortment of courses. And this buffet of options may be just what you need to avoid boredom and stay motivated to sweat regularly.

Whether you prefer in-person workouts, online sessions, or a little bit of each, the key to remember is to stay active, said Jafra Thomas, assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Public Health at California Polytechnic State. University in San Luis Obispo.

“Unfortunately, the cultures around exercise encourage you to compare yourself to artificial beauty standards or adopt unrealistic expectations about when you will see benefits,” he said. “While the appreciation of movement is rarely encouraged by platform builders or instructors, physical activity offers many health benefits. “

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Climate Change and Health – Jammu Kashmir Latest News | Tourism https://companyofcyclists.com/climate-change-and-health-jammu-kashmir-latest-news-tourism/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 19:01:55 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/climate-change-and-health-jammu-kashmir-latest-news-tourism/ Dr Richa Mahajan,Dr Rajiv K Gupta Climate change is a critical public health problem which, in addition to introducing new parasites and pathogens into communities, exacerbates many existing diseases and conditions. Climate change indicates an increase in sea surface temperature, an increase in the severity of extreme weather events, a rise in sea level, melting […]]]>


Dr Richa Mahajan,
Dr Rajiv K Gupta

Climate change is a critical public health problem which, in addition to introducing new parasites and pathogens into communities, exacerbates many existing diseases and conditions. Climate change indicates an increase in sea surface temperature, an increase in the severity of extreme weather events, a rise in sea level, melting glaciers, a decrease in air quality and an increase greenhouse gas emissions. We still have not been able to forget the devastating effects of the Kashmir floods (2014), the Uttarakhand flash floods (2013) and the tsunami (2004). The southern states of Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh have witnessed flood-like situations due to heavy rains in recent times. Whether in the Western Ghats or the Himalayas, states have compelling reasons to address and mitigate their climate-related vulnerabilities. The Madhav Gadgil committee in 2011 recommended that a section of approximately 130,000 km² covering Gujarat, Karnataka, Kerala, Maharashtra and Tamil Nadu be declared an environmentally sensitive area, but the recommendations have yet to be declared. been accepted despite enormous loss of wealth and lives. .
The direct and indirect health consequences of such a global imbalance include diseases related to excessive heat, vector-borne and water-borne diseases, increased exposure to environmental toxins, and exacerbation of cardiovascular and respiratory diseases due to the decline air quality. The most vulnerable people – children, the elderly, the poor and those with underlying co-morbidities – are at increased risk of health effects from climate change. Between 2030 and 2050, climate change is expected to cause an additional 250,000 deaths per year, due to malnutrition, malaria, diarrhea and heat stress.
To mitigate and adapt to climate change, the Prime Minister’s Council on Climate Change (PMCC), India released the National Climate Change Action Plan (NAPCC) with eight missions in June 2008. In 2015 , India’s response to climate change has been broadened by introducing four new missions including “Health”. The proposed “health mission” will address the health-related aspects of climate change through a multi-pronged approach. As a result, the National Action Plan for Climate Change and Human Health (NAPCCHH) was prepared in 2018 with the aim of strengthening health services against the adverse effects of climate change on health. The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MoHFW) approved the National Program on Climate Change and Human Health (NPCCHH) under the National Health Mission (NHM) in February 2019. Currently, the three main focus areas of the NPCCHH are air pollution, heat-related illnesses and building green and climate-resilient health facilities.
Prime Minister Narendra Modi also presented five nectar elements, ‘Panchamrit’, to tackle the challenge of climate change at the COP26 summit in Glasgow:
* India will increase its non-fossil energy capacity to 500 GW by 2030.
* India will meet 50% of its energy needs from renewable energies by 2030.
* India will reduce total projected carbon emissions by one billion tonnes by 2030.
* By 2030, India will reduce the carbon intensity of its economy by less than 45%.
* By 2070, India will meet the Net Zero target.
The promotion of renewable energy by the Indian government is a strong commitment to climate change. We can also help reduce the effects of climate change by making small changes in our way of life such as:
* Replace old appliances with energy efficient models and bulbs / LEDs.
* Save electricity by turning them off completely when not in use, including your computer.
* Reduce, reuse and recycle waste.
* Plant more trees.
* Promote the use of public transport and active travel (walking, cycling, etc.).
* Use renewable energies. If you have the possibility, install solar panels in your home.
* Bring your own bag when shopping.
* Use a refillable water bottle and a coffee mug. Reduce waste.
Rising global temperatures, record levels of greenhouse gas emissions and the growing impacts of climate change require urgent and measurable action from everyone.


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City planner urges governments to improve Australia’s cycling infrastructure https://companyofcyclists.com/city-planner-urges-governments-to-improve-australias-cycling-infrastructure/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 23:40:43 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/city-planner-urges-governments-to-improve-australias-cycling-infrastructure/ To keep pace with the increase in the number of cyclists, e-bikes and e-scooters, and to meet Australia’s net zero goals, lead urban designer Andrew Brodie – of town planning and design firm Hatch RobertsDay – urges governments to dramatically improve cycling infrastructure in the Australian region urban areas declaring that the boom in electric […]]]>


To keep pace with the increase in the number of cyclists, e-bikes and e-scooters, and to meet Australia’s net zero goals, lead urban designer Andrew Brodie – of town planning and design firm Hatch RobertsDay – urges governments to dramatically improve cycling infrastructure in the Australian region urban areas declaring that the boom in electric mobility and cycling during COVID is putting immense stress on cycle lanes, main streets and city centers.

The COVID pandemic and the lockdowns that followed have encouraged a dramatic uptake in cycling. Australia’s bicycle imports grew 46% between fiscal 2019 and FY21, while e-bike imports are said to have increased 800% in the past five years.

Brodie notes that “Australia’s lack of safe and accessible cycling infrastructure means cyclists are often forced to share routes with pedestrians or cars. The councils favored quick fixes, such as painted cycle lanes with little protection for drivers from cars. Cycling networks are often not well planned, with lanes ending abruptly at dangerous intersections. The risk of accidents must be managed and imposes an urgent need to invest in safe cycling infrastructure and in the design of complete streets.

“In urban design, greater emphasis is placed on complete streets, which balance the needs of bicycles, pedestrians, transit, delivery vehicles and cars, while creating attractive destinations. Our recent Complete Streets projects represent a relatively inexpensive and high-value carbon reduction investment. “

While the health and environmental benefits of cycling are well documented, Brodie points out that there is also evidence of economic improvement resulting from increased use.

Brodie adds “some of the world’s most beloved cities, like Paris and Barcelona, ​​are reinventing themselves as privileged places for people, favoring pedestrians and bicycles over cars. Paris recently announced $ 386 million in funding to add 186 km of protected cycle paths and triple the number of bicycle parking spaces in the city.

In Australia, the cycling industry injected $ 6.3 billion into the Australian economy in 2020, with around a third of Australian adults spending on cycling-related goods and services, according to a new report. The report also pointed out that millions more would be contributed to the economy with improved cycling infrastructure, which would encourage Australians to ride more.

Brodie reveals six steps to improve Australia’s cycling infrastructure to become a world leader of bike-friendly cities.

1. Favor bicycles and pedestrians over cars. For too long, cars have been the priority mode of transport in Australia. To ensure a safer infrastructure that prioritizes low-carbon mobility, a 180-degree mindset shift is needed in the design, management and education around the movement network at all decision-making levels. It ranges from the structure and powers of state agencies to the many little things that add up to make a big difference.

2. Address security. Safety is the biggest obstacle causing hesitation in cycling. In fact, an estimated 69% of Australian bicycle consumers would be encouraged to ride more if there was an increased sense of safety when riding in traffic. The simple litmus test for any new cycling infrastructure should be: is it safe enough for a 7-year-old and their 70-year-old grandparents?

3. Fill in the gaps in the cycling network. Cash-strapped councils are often unable to make improvements to the cycling network, and trails often end abruptly or do not offer routes between home and key destinations, such as shops, schools, universities and public transport. These dangerous vulnerabilities in the network prevent people from commuting between home and work, school or stores. When cycle paths are easy to navigate and the number of well-connected cyclists will increase. Governments need to consider the larger cycling network and how the different LGAs intersect, as well as accommodating a mix of users, including routes for recreation and recreation, exercise and as a mode of transport.

4. Make protected cycle paths. Painted cycle lanes are the most basic level of infrastructure for the government, and they often lack protection against fast moving cars. Protected cycle paths separated by physical barriers like parked cars, a sidewalk or landscaping provide a buffer zone against busy roads. Evidence suggests that they also make roads safe for cars.

5.Use speed to dictate how the modes of transport mix. Often times, cyclists, and especially e-bikes and e-scooters, are forced to compete for space with pedestrians on already busy lanes. In Australia, electric bicycle motors are capped at 250 watts and the power cuts off when they reach 25 km / h. At such speed, they must be separated from pedestrians for safety reasons and accommodated on cycle lanes, protected cycle lanes and in streets where traffic is slow. When a cyclist is struck at 45 km / h or more, they have a 50% or less chance of surviving. But this increases up to a 90% chance of survival, if they are struck at 30 km / h.

6. Design of complete streets. Through thoughtful design, Complete Streets provides safe and accessible mobility for all modes of transport and all capacity levels, while beautifying public spaces with greenery and making them more vibrant and attractive. Hatch RobertsDay’s Complete Streets projects in Bondi Junction and Bankstown in Sydney and in the town of Vic Park in Perth offer a myriad of benefits. More active transportation helps reduce obesity and improve the mental health of residents, it increases the safety of cyclists and pedestrians, reduces carbon emissions and can stimulate economic growth by creating attractive places with more activities. of street.

Image: Concept for Hatch RobertsDay’s Complete Streets project. Courtesy robertsday.com.au/

Related Articles

December 10, 2021 – AusCycling’s Ride Nation program to receive $ 5 million in funding from the federal government

September 16, 2021 – ACT park rangers test power tools and electric bikes

July 7, 2021 – Lack of cycling infrastructure limits sustainable lifestyles and has an impact on public health

July 2, 2021 – Christchurch City Council seeks suppliers of e-bikes and e-scooters for public rental

June 3, 2021 – Australia imports record number of bikes

February 24, 2021 – Darwin improves signage for cycling network for fitness, recreation and tourism

January 14, 2021 – Bicycle maintenance station installed along the Rail Trail of Mont Gambier

October 8, 2020 – Melbourne city center city councils welcome funding for integrated cycling network

October 2, 2020 – The town of Fremantle celebrates WA Bike Month

August 27, 2020 – New bike lanes and upgrades planned in Brisbane

June 15, 2020 – 40 kilometers of new fast-track cycle paths in Melbourne

September 16, 2019 – Shoalhaven City Council supports NSW Bike Week

October 12, 2015 – Bicycle Network Announces New Women-Only Cycling Initiative

December 23, 2011 – Making Australia More Bike Friendly


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MGH expert responds to 100,000 overdose deaths – Harvard Gazette https://companyofcyclists.com/mgh-expert-responds-to-100000-overdose-deaths-harvard-gazette/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 21:33:03 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/mgh-expert-responds-to-100000-overdose-deaths-harvard-gazette/ The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently reported that the number of overdose deaths in the United States exceeded 100,000 for the first time in a 12-month period, ending in April. The grim milestone represents an increase of almost 30 percent from the previous 12-month period. Fentanyl, 100 times more potent than heroin, and […]]]>


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently reported that the number of overdose deaths in the United States exceeded 100,000 for the first time in a 12-month period, ending in April. The grim milestone represents an increase of almost 30 percent from the previous 12-month period. Fentanyl, 100 times more potent than heroin, and other synthetic opioids have been linked to the majority of deaths, and experts say COVID-related isolation and anxiety reversed pre-pandemic progress against opioid abuse.

The Gazette spoke with Sarah Wakeman, medical director of the Substance Use Disorders Initiative at Massachusetts General Hospital and Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School, about what can be done to save lives. The interview has been edited for clarity and length.

GAZETTE: What is fueling the increase in overdose deaths?

WAKEMAN: The crisis and its worsening are linked to several factors. One is the continued unpredictability and poisoning of the illicit drug supply. Increasingly, the drug supply is contaminated with fentanyl, and there is a lot of unpredictability in what people are consuming.

You can compare it to alcohol, for which we have a regulated supply. Of course, we always worry about alcohol use disorders and we identify and treat them. But if you go to a restaurant, bar, or store and drink alcohol, you know the alcohol level based on the volume of the product you consume. But imagine you order a drink and it could be 5% beer or 80 degree alcohol – that would be a huge difference, and you would have no idea how to regulate that.

GAZETTE: What about the effects of COVID?

WAKEMAN: An ongoing meta-problem, even before COVID, was this growing unpredictability of drug supply and the backdrop of decades of policy approaches that failed to support or adequately fund effective treatment or harm reduction interventions. to reduce overdose deaths. And then COVID came along and amplified things in a number of ways. First, it is the increase in trauma, social isolation, loss of economic opportunity, boredom, hopelessness, all of these factors that we know can increase chaotic substance use. It has also made it more difficult to access some of the treatments and resources that keep people safe. For example, many of the harm reduction interventions we recommend for people, such as never using alone or seeking treatment services, have become much more difficult in the days of COVID. And fundamentally, I think we are seeing the end result of years of unsuccessful policies and approaches to thinking about drug use and addiction and how we should address these complex public health challenges.

The other part that has been really crucial to note is the deepening racial disparities in the overdose crisis. In Massachusetts between 2019 and 2020, there was a 75% increase in opioid-related overdose deaths among black men. I think the public discourse has been that this problem only affects white communities. But the reality is that black communities are ravaged by overdoses, and the health harms of racism are increasingly evident in the overdose crisis. This is in addition to the fact that many of these communities have already been devastated by the failed and racist war on drugs, resulting in the separation of families by the child welfare system, people sent to prison, incarceration. instead of processing.

GAZETTE: Men aged 24 to 54 have been the most affected by the wave of overdoses. What is your response to this statistic?

WAKEMAN: I think these are young people with decades of life ahead of them, and I think about what went wrong: the supply strategies. This strategy is “just making it harder for people to get in” – a focus on opioid prescriptions, border crackdowns, increased funding for the DEA, and increased criminal prosecutions for drug-related charges – was totally ineffective. Yet that’s what we keep hearing about, even now in 2021, and that’s where our funding is headed.

I find a useful framing is “recovery from what to what?” What does someone really need in order to recover? And what is their hope for recovery in the future? If you are not housed, if you do not have a job, if you have gone back and forth through the criminal justice system, if you have been treated terribly by the systems, if you have been the victim of racism, if you have you have no hope for anything, why would you stop using drugs? Drugs are the only thing that will allow you to cope with this reality. And if you use drugs, what strategies can we implement that we know will reduce your risk of dying?


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Stronger climate action urged at COP26 to avoid “unimaginable” health risks https://companyofcyclists.com/stronger-climate-action-urged-at-cop26-to-avoid-unimaginable-health-risks/ https://companyofcyclists.com/stronger-climate-action-urged-at-cop26-to-avoid-unimaginable-health-risks/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 20:17:00 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/stronger-climate-action-urged-at-cop26-to-avoid-unimaginable-health-risks/ Health risks linked to climate change are increasing Linking work on mitigation, adaptation and health could help UK NHS among healthcare systems poised to cut own emissions GLASGOW, November 6 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – From extreme heat to worsening hunger and water shortages, accelerating climate change threatens “unimaginable” health consequences, scientists and health officials on […]]]>


  • Health risks linked to climate change are increasing
  • Linking work on mitigation, adaptation and health could help
  • UK NHS among healthcare systems poised to cut own emissions

GLASGOW, November 6 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – From extreme heat to worsening hunger and water shortages, accelerating climate change threatens “unimaginable” health consequences, scientists and health officials on the sidelines of the UN climate talks at COP26 in Glasgow.

As with the COVID-19 pandemic, “it won’t be long before the entire world population is affected, directly or indirectly,” said former Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard, now head of the charity British Health Wellcome Trust.

But a large number of possible changes – from making it easier to cycle and walk in cities to changing diets and the rise of renewables – could together curb global warming, protect health, and improve people’s lives. billion people, experts said.

Achieving these changes will require not only investment and effort to make the health benefits clearer, but also, crucially, the integration of people who do not normally work on health issues.

With enormous influence on air pollution and the way people choose to travel, for example, “the Minister of Transport is probably more of a Minister of Health than the Minister of Health,” noted Richard Smith, chairman of the UK Health Alliance on Climate Change.

Too often, efforts to reduce emissions, adapt to climate threats and address health issues are conducted separately, but “we need these people to work together for integrated solutions,” said Andy Haines of the London School. of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

This could include things like adding more trees and water-absorbing green spaces to poor areas of cities, to tackle both inequality, flooding and heat risks, while also strengthening nature and improving mental health.

“The solutions are the same for the climate, our health and our biodiversity,” said Rayan Kassem, regional director for West Asia for Youth4Nature, a green nonprofit focused on climate and natural solutions.

AIR POLLUTION

Climate change is already the root of various health threats around the world, said Haines, professor of environmental change and public health.

For example, the ranges of insect-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue are shifting as weather conditions change, and heat deaths are increasing rapidly, more than a third of those recorded between 1990 and 2018 being attributed to climate change, he said.

The increase in the number of forest fires, floods, droughts and extreme heat is also having “truly devastating effects” on mental health, alongside the concerns many people have about the future with the worsening of the disease. climate change, Haines said.

As permafrost melts in the rapidly warming Arctic, it could even expose “Methuselah organisms” – bacteria and viruses long frozen and potentially deadly, he said.

“As we release them, we don’t know what’s going to happen to human health,” he said.

But some health risks linked to climate change are already well known.

Air pollution, largely linked to the use of fossil fuels, kills an estimated 7 million people a year, said Diarmid Campbell-Lendrum, who heads the climate and health unit of the World Organization. health.

A major step towards reducing this risk would be removing what the International Monetary Fund says is $ 5.9 trillion in direct and indirect subsidies to the fossil fuel industry each year, making artificially polluting fuels cheaper, did he declare.

“We have to stop spending money on the bad things and start spending it on the good things,” said Campbell-Lendrum, an avid cyclist who has ridden 1,600 km to the top of Glasgow from Geneva.

Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah, whose nine-year-old daughter Ella died in London in 2013 from a severe asthma attack that coroners attributed to “excessive air pollution,” told conference attendees that “breathing clean air is a human right”.

The United Nations Human Rights Council first adopted a resolution in October recognizing access to a healthy and sustainable environment as a universal right.

Poornima Prabhakaran, deputy director of the Center for Environmental Health at the Public Health Foundation of India, said air pollution also had “huge social and economic costs” for her country, which is home to 15 of the 20 most polluted cities in the world.

“This crisis is real,” she said. “We don’t want a cosmetic answer … We want real, tangible action.”

People who are already disadvantaged and less able to prepare for, respond to and recover from the impacts of climate change will be the most affected, warned Susan Aitken, head of Glasgow City Council.

“This is as true here in a city like Glasgow as it is on a global scale,” she said.

NHS GREENER?

As they search for ways to limit growing health threats, doctors and hospitals are also looking for ways to reduce their own emissions.

Nick Watts, sustainability manager for Britain’s National Health Service (NHS), said the $ 120 billion a year service accounts for around 5% of UK greenhouse gas emissions – roughly the same as a country like Denmark or Croatia.

To help meet Britain’s goal of cutting emissions by 78% by 2035, the service has set an initial one-year target to phase out emissions equivalent to those used to fuel 1.1 million homes in the country every year.

This involves things like making buildings more energy efficient, asking suppliers to meet NHS net zero targets, and reducing transport emissions from the service itself and its users through changes such as more appointments. you online.

The NHS ‘first zero-emission ambulance, currently being tested in Birmingham, is also parked at the COP26 site in Glasgow.

“This will be the future of healthcare in this country and everywhere else,” Watts said at the conference.

Jeni Miller, executive director of the Global Climate and Health Alliance, stressed that many other national climate plans must take into account threats to health – and that reducing emissions will be key to reducing those risks.

“The decisions taken at COP26 will define the health and well-being of people (…) for years to come,” she said.

Reporting by Laurie Goering @lauriegoering; edited by Megan Rowling. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters. Visit http://news.trust.org/climate

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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Loss of biodiversity, a global phenomenon https://companyofcyclists.com/loss-of-biodiversity-a-global-phenomenon/ https://companyofcyclists.com/loss-of-biodiversity-a-global-phenomenon/#respond Tue, 02 Nov 2021 17:17:06 +0000 https://companyofcyclists.com/loss-of-biodiversity-a-global-phenomenon/ The research results show that human disturbance has led to an ecological crisis on a global scale. A study published in Ecology Letters reveals that human disturbances affect the disease dynamics of a place through its effect on the prevalence of host and parasite species in geography, as Mongabay-India reports. Researchers from the Indian Institute […]]]>


The research results show that human disturbance has led to an ecological crisis on a global scale.

A study published in Ecology Letters reveals that human disturbances affect the disease dynamics of a place through its effect on the prevalence of host and parasite species in geography, as Mongabay-India reports.

Researchers from the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Tirupati and the University of Georgia, South Carolina, USA, conducted the study in the 600 km south of the Indian Western Ghats, a treasure trove of biodiversity and one of the eight “hottest spots” of biodiversity.

The regions of the Western Ghats have been subjected to severe human disturbance. They are known to house host communities that have become less diverse over time. In many well-characterized host-parasite systems, low diversity communities tend to include host populations that are most competent to harbor and transmit parasites. Parasites retained in disturbed ecosystems are mostly hardy and can infect multiple species, a characteristic that also increases their ability to cause emerging infectious diseases.

Research results show that human disturbance has led to an ecological crisis on a global scale, one of the primary impacts being the loss of biodiversity and the alteration of the community structure of many species. This altered structure of the parasitic community can lead to an increased frequency of outbreaks of infectious diseases, many of which are emerging and re-emerging.

Parasites are important parts of ecological networks and biodiversity. Known as ecosystem engineers, they help shape community structure by influencing host populations in multiple ways and regulating food web stability or “what-to-eat-what in a community.” Thus, the loss of parasitic species can lead to a biodiversity crisis with dramatic impacts on ecosystem health and services, including nutrient and energy cycling, and disease dynamics.

The study authors say that these disturbances could be anything that results from human presence or their activities, for example, how humans use the land they inhabit. “We have found that human disturbances and the structure of the host community affect the structure of the parasite community after controlling the effects of the environment, ie the climate, the terrain,” reports Mongabay-India. Humans continue to alter the environment and encroach on wild spaces, researchers say, potentially contributing to the increase in emerging infectious diseases such as COVID-19 and other zoonotic diseases that spread from wildlife to humans. by altering parasite communities and their host preferences.

The link between increasing infectious disease epidemics and loss of biodiversity has been around for some time, being attributed to the persistence and proliferation of general practitioners. In addition, human proximity to wildlife increases the propensity for transmission of pathogens occurring in nature. Sometimes the pathogen can pass to humans from a non-human animal that it may inhabit, causing a zoonosis. More than half of the pathogenic organisms in humans are zoonotic, with about 13% of the total emerging and re-emerging organisms. A steady increase in zoonotic diseases has been observed in recent times, with India being one of the four most affected countries.

Sampling was carried out in four large geographic regions separated by three biogeographic barriers which are mostly isolated and show no record of disease prevalence and modes of transmission. Large parts of these areas lie beneath the network of protected areas, however, fragmented human settlements are uncovered, paving the way for analysis of the effects of human disturbance in otherwise isolated areas.

The authors elucidate how climate, habitat, and human disturbance affect parasite prevalence both directly and indirectly through their effects on host diversity. They emphasize that there is a critical need for conservation and public health policy experts to work together to ensure healthy ecosystems conducive to healthy human and wildlife populations.

The Mongabay-India report indicates that biodiversity loss is accelerating globally and locally with around one million species threatened with extinction, according to the 2019 Global Assessment Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, argued by the United Nations. Extinctions, however, are not random. Some species are extremely vulnerable to extinction while others are not. In free species, or species that do not depend on other organisms for their survival, specialists are more sensitive to environmental disturbances than generalists. Specialists are organisms that feed on a narrow diversity of resources or habitats, while those that acclimatize to a wide variety of resources are called generalists. Likewise, there are specialized parasites which infect only one or a few related host species and generalist parasites which prefer to inhabit a wide variety of hosts.

Experts around the world suggest a cross-sectoral (One Health) approach to mitigate the challenge posed by increasing biodiversity loss, especially in the case of zoonotic diseases.


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